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rf arm-profile

rf arm-profile <profile>

40MHz-allowed-bands {All|None|a-only|g-only}

80MHz support

160MHz support {Auto|Contiguous-only|Non-contiguous-only|None}

acceptable-coverage-index <number>

active-scan (not intended for use)

aggressive-scan

assignment {disable|maintain|multi-band|single-band}

backoff-time <seconds>

cellular-handoff-assist

channel-quality-aware-arm

channel-quality-threshold <channel-quality-threshold>

channel-quality-wait-time <seconds>

client-aware

client-match

clone <profile>

cm-band-a-min-signal <cm-band-a-min-signal>

cm-band-g-max-signal <cm-band-g-max-signal>

cm-dot11v

cm-he-min-signal

cm-lb-client-thresh <#-of-clients>

cm-lb-signal-delta <cm-lb-signal-delta>

cm-lb-snr-thresh <dB>

cm-lb-thresh <%-of-clients>

cm-max-steer-fails <#-of-fails>

cm-mu-client-thresh <count>

cm-mu-snr-thresh <value>

cm-report-interval

cm-stale-age <secs>

cm-steer-backoff <secs>

cm-steer-timeout <secs>

cm-sticky-check_intvl <secs>

cm-sticky-min-signal <-dB>

cm-sticky-snr <dB>

cm-sticky-snr-delta

cm-update-interval <dB>

cm-unst-ageout-interval days <days> hours <hours>

cm-unst-ageout

dynamic-bw

dynamic-bw-beacon-failed-thresh <dynamic-bw-beacon-failed-thresh>

dynamic-bw-cca-ibss-thresh <dynamic-bw-cca-ibss-thresh>

dynamic-bw-cca-intf-thresh <dynamic-bw-cca-intf-thresh>

dynamic-bw-clear-time <dynamic-bw-clear-time>

dynamic-bw-wait-time <dynamic-bw-wait-time>

error-rate-threshold <percent>

error-rate-wait-time <seconds>

free-channel-index <number>

high-noise-backoff-time <high-noise-backoff-time>

ideal-coverage-index <number>

interfering-ap-weight <number>

load-aware-scan-threshold

max-tx-power <dBm>

min-scan-time <# of scans>

min-tx-power <dBm>

mode-aware

multi-band-scan

no ...

ota-updates

ps-aware-scan

radar-backoff-time <radar-backoff-time>

rogue-ap-aware

scan mode {all-reg-domain|reg-domain}

scan-interval

scanning

video-aware-scan

voip-aware-scan

Description

This command configures the Adaptive Radio Management (ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. ) profile.

Syntax

Parameter

Description

Range

Default

<profile>

Name of this instance of the profile. The name must be 1-63 characters.

“default”

40MHz-allowed -bands

The specified setting allows ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. to determine if 40 MHzMegahertz mode of operation is allowed on the 5 GHzGigahertz. or 2.4 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. only, on both frequency bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation., or on neither frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

All/None/
a-only/g-only

a-only

All

Allows 40 MHzMegahertz channels on both the 5 GHZ (802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps.) and 2.4 GHZ (802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g) frequency bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

None

Disallows use of 40 MHzMegahertz channels.

a-only

Allows use of 40 MHzMegahertz channels on the 5 GHZ (802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps.) frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. only.

g-only

Allows use of 40 MHzMegahertz channels on the 2.4 GHZ (802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g) frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. only.

80MHz-support

If enabled, 80 MHzMegahertz channels can be used in the 5 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. on APs that support 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band..

enabled

160MHz support

Specifies which 160MHz mode to be assigned. This parameter does not apply to 2.4GHz frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

Auto

Allows automatic selection of contiguous frequency.

Contiguous-only

Allows to assign contiguous only 160MHz channel bandwidth.

Non-contiguous-only

Allows to assign non-contiguous 160MHz channel bandwidth.

None

This sub-parameter disallows assigning 160MHz channel bandwidth.

acceptable- coverage-index

The minimal coverage that the AP should try to achieve on its channel. The denser the AP deployment, the lower this value should be.

This setting applies to multi-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. implementations only.

1-6

4

active-scan

When active-scan is enabled, an AP initiates active scanning via probe request. This option elicits more information from nearby APs, but also creates additional management traffic on the network. This feature is disabled by default, and should not be enabled except under the direct supervision of Aruba Technical Support.

Default: disabled

disabled

aggressive-scan

When this feature is enabled, an AP radio with no clients will scan channels every second.

enabled

assignment

Activates one of four ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. channel/power assignment modes.

single-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. (new installations only)

disable

Disables ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. channel/power assignments.

maintain

Maintains existing channel assignments.

multi-band

Computes ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. assignments for both 5 GHZ (802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps.) and 2.4 GHZ (802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g) frequency bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

single-band

Computes ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. assignments for a single bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

backoff-time

Time, in seconds, an AP backs off after requesting a new channel or power.

120-3600

240 sec

cellular-handoff
-assist

When both the ClientMatch and cellular handoff assist features are enabled, the cellular handoff assist feature can help a dual-mode, 3GThird Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See W-CDMA. or 4GFourth Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See LTE.-capable Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. device such as an iPhone, iPad, or Android client at the edge of Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. network coverage switch from Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. to an alternate 3GThird Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See W-CDMA. or 4GFourth Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See LTE. radio that provides better network access. This feature is disabled by default, and is recommended only for Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. hotspotHotspot refers to a WLAN node that provides Internet connection and virtual private network (VPN) access from a given location. A business traveler, for example, with a laptop equipped for Wi-Fi can look up a local hotspot, contact it, and get connected through its network to reach the Internet. deployments.

NOTE: To configure this feature for an individual AP radio, use the command wlan virtual-ap profile <profile> cellular-handoff-assist.

disabled

channel-quality
-aware-arm

If enabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment.  changes are based upon an internally calculated channel quality metric. When this feature is disabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. initiates channel changes based on thresholds defined in this profile, and chooses the channel based on the calculated interference index value.. Default: Disabled

disabled

channel-quality -threshold

Channel quality percentage below which ARM initiates a channel change.

0-100

70

channel-quality-wait-time

If channel quality is below the specified channel quality threshold for this wait time period, ARM initiates a channel change.

1-3600

120

client-aware

If the Client Aware option is enabled, the AP does not change channels if there is active client traffic on that AP. If Client Aware is disabled, the AP may change to a more optimal channel, but this change may also disrupt current client traffic.

enabled

client match

ClientMatch helps optimize network resources by balancing clients across channels, regardless of whether the AP or the controller is responding to the wireless client’s probe requests.

If enabled, the controller compares whether or not an AP has more clients than its neighboring APs on other channels. If an AP’s client load is at or over a predetermined threshold as compared to its immediate neighbors, or if a neighboring Aruba AP on another channel does not have any clients, load balancing will be enabled on that AP. This feature is enabled by default

enabled

clone

Name of an existing ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profile from which parameter values are copied.

cm-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.-a-min-
signal <cm-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.-a
-min-signal>

Minimum signal level required for the targeted A bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. radio in a Client Match bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steer move (-dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.).

0-255 dbm

75

cm-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.-g-max
-signal <cm-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.-g
-max-signal>

Maximum signal level of the G bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. radio that can trigger a Client Match bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steer move (-dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.)

0-255 dbm

45

cm-dot11v

Client Match steers using 802.11v802.11v is an IEEE standard that allows client devices to exchange information about the network topology and RF environment. This information is used for assigning best available radio resources for the client devices to provide seamless connectivity. BSSBasic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. Transition Management.

enabled

cm-he-min-signal

Minimum signal required for the targeted HE move (-dbm).

0-255 dbm

55

cm-lb-client-thresh <#-of-clients>

If an AP radio has fewer clients than the client match load balancing threshold defined by this parameter, the AP will not participate in load balancing.

0-100
clients

30

cm-lb-signal
-delta

Client match will not move a client to a new radio if the signal strength of the target AP is this dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels. value lower than the radio to which the client is currently associated. This parameter works differently than the cm-lb-snr-thresh value, which imposes a definite value on the target AP's signal-to-noise radio. the cm-lb-signal-delta imposes a relative constraint based upon the signal strength of the radio to which the client is currently associated.

0-20 dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels.

5 dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels.

cm-lb-snr-thresh <dB>

Clients must detect a SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. from an underutilized AP radio at or above this threshold before ClientMatch considers load balancing a client to that radio.

0-100 dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels.

25

cm-lb-thresh <%-of-clients>

When ClientMatch is enabled, clients may be steered from a highly utilized channel on an AP to a channel with fewer clients. If a channel on an AP radio has this percentage fewer clients than another channel supported by the client, ClientMatch may move clients from the busier channel to the channel with fewer clients.

0-100 %

20

cm-max-steer-fails <#-of-fails>

The controller keeps track of the number of times ClientMatch failed to steer a client to a different radio, and the reason that each steer attempt was triggered. If ClientMatch attempts to steer a client to a new radio multiple consecutive times for the same reason but client steering fails each time, the controller notifies the AP to mark the client as unsteerable for that specific trigger.

This parameter defines the maximum allowed number of client match steering fails with the same trigger before the client is marked as unsteerable for that trigger.

0-100 failures

5

cm-mu-client-thresh <count>

Total number of clients that can be associated to a radio, in which the radio can still be considered for multi-user (MU) steering.

0-255 dbm

15

cm-mu-snr-thresh <value>

Minimum SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. value of a client on the target radio, in which the radio can still be considered for multi-user (MU) steering.

0-255 dbm

30

cm-report- interval <secs>

This interval defines how often an AP sends an updated client probe report to the controller. Each client probe report contains a list of MACMedia Access Control. A MAC address is a unique identifier assigned to network interfaces for communications on a network.  addresses for clients that have been active in the last two minutes, and the AP radio SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. values seen by those clients.

0-255 secs

30

cm-stale-age <secs>

The controller can maintain client match data for the maximum number of supported clients for that controller platform, showing the detected SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. values for up to 16 candidate APs per client. This table is periodically updated as APs send client probe reports to the controller. This parameter defines the amount of time that the controller should retain client match data from each client probe report.

Different controller types support varying numbers of clients.

7005: 1024 client

7010: 2048 clients

7030: 4096 clients

7240: 32000 clients

7220: 24000 clients

7210: 16000 clients

0- 65535 seconds

900 secs

cm-steer-backoff

Client Match will attempt one IOS steer at the configured backoff time interval.

0-2,147,483, 647 seconds  
cm-steer-timeout

When a client is steered from one AP to a more desirable AP, the steer timeout feature helps facilitate the move by defining the amount of time that any APs to which the client should NOT associate will not respond to the AP.

0-255
secs

 

cm-sticky-check -interval

<secs>

Frequency at which the AP checks for client's received SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. values. If the SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. value drops below the threshold defined by the cm-sticky-snr parameter for three consecutive check intervals, that client may be moved to an different AP.

0-255
secs

3 secs

cm-sticky-min -signal <-dB>

A client triggered to move to a different AP may consider an AP radio a better match if the client detects that the signal from the candidate AP radio is at or higher than the minimum signal level defined by this parameterand the candidate radio has a higher signal strength than the radio to which the client is currently associated. (The required improvement in signal strength can be defined using the cm-sticky-snr-delta command.)

0-255
(-dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels.)

65

cm-sticky-snr <dB>

If the client's received signal strength indicator (RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values.) is above this signal-to-noise ratio (SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise.) threshold, that client will be allowed to stay associated to its current AP. If the client's received signal strength is below this threshold, it may be moved to a different AP.

0-255 dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels.

18

cm-sticky-snr-delta

A client triggered to move to a different AP may consider an AP radio a better match if the client detects that the signal from the AP radio is stronger than its current radio by the dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels. level defined by the cm-sticky-snr-thresh parameter, and the candidate radio also has a minimum signal level defined by the cm-sticky-min-signal parameter.

0-100 dBDecibel. Unit of measure for sound or noise and is the difference or ratio between two signal levels.

10

cm-unst-ageout-
interval days <days>

The client entries in an unsteerable client list remain in effect for the interval defined by this parameter before they age out.

2 days

cm-unst-ageout

When client match and the client match unsteerable client ageout feature are enabled, the controller periodically sends APs that are not a desired AP match for a client in a list of unsteerable clients. These lists contain a list of MACMedia Access Control. A MAC address is a unique identifier assigned to network interfaces for communications on a network. addresses for up to 128 clients that should not be steered to that AP.

The following controller types support a aggregate maximum of unsteerable clients for all APs associated to that controller.

7005: 256 unsteerable clients

7010: 512 unsteerable clients

7030: 1024 unsteerable clients

7240: 8000 unsteerable clients

7220: 6000 unsteerable clients

7210: 4000 unsteerable clients

dynamic-bw

Issue the dynamic-bw parameter to enable the ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. dynamic bandwidth switch feature. When enabled ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. can detect 20MHz interferers that can impact an AP radio using an 80MHz channel and move the AP radio to another 80MHz channel. For more information, see 80MHz Dynamic Bandwidth Switch

disabled

dynamic-bw-beacon-failed-thresh

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. dynamic bandwidth switch feature may trigger a change in the radio channel bandwidth if the number of failed beacons exceeds this value during the observation window.

1-500

30

dynamic-bw-cca-ibss-thresh

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. dynamic bandwidth switch feature may trigger a change in the radio channel bandwidth if the clear channel asignment IBSS percentage drops below this value during the observation window.

1-100

10

dynamic-bw-cca-intf-thresh

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. dynamic bandwidth switch feature may trigger a change in the radio channel bandwidth if the clear channel assignment interference percentage exceeds this value during the observation window.

1-100

30

dynamic-bw-clear-time

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. dynamic bandwidth switch feature returns the AP radio to 80MHz channel after this clear time period if there is no high volume of traffic.

1-300 seconds

30

dynamic-bw-wait-time

Minimum time in seconds dynamic bandwidth switch indicators have to be true to trigger a 80MHz to 40MHz bandwidth change.

1-300 seconds

30

error-rate-
threshold

The percentage of errors in the channel that triggers a channel change. Recommended value is 50%. A value of 0% disables this feature.

0-100

default-a: 70%

default-g: 70%

error-rate-wait
-time

Time, in seconds, that the error rate has to be at least the error rate threshold to trigger a channel change.

Supported range is 1-2,147,483,647

Recommended Values: 1-100

_

default-a: 90 sec

default-g: 90 sec

free-channel-
index

The difference in the interference index between the new channel and current channel must exceed this value for the AP to move to a new channel. The higher this value, the lower the chance an AP will move to the new channel. Recommended value is 25.

10-40

default-a: 40

default-g: 25

high-noise-backoff-time

The duration, in minutes, for blacklisting AirMatch Solver's channel after 2 consecutive high noise detections. Setting the value to 0 disables the backoff window.

0-3600

Default: 720 minutes (12 hours)

ideal-coverage-
index

The coverage that the AP should try to achieve on its channel. The denser the AP deployment, the lower this value should be. Recommended value is 10.

2-20

default-a: 6

default-g: 6

load-aware-scan -threshold

Load aware ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. preserves network resources during periods of high traffic by temporarily halting ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. scanning if the load for the AP gets too high.

The Load Aware Scan Threshold is the traffic throughput level an AP must reach before it stops scanning. The supported range for this setting is 0-20000000 bytes/second. (Specify 0 to disable this feature.)

1250000 bytes/second

max-tx-power

Maximum effective isotropic radiated power (EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna.) from 3 to 33 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. in 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. increments. You may also specify a special value of 127 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. for regulatory maximum to disable power adjustments for environments such as outdoor mesh links. This value takes into account both radio transmit power and antenna gain.

Higher power level settings may be constrained by local regulatory requirements and AP capabilities.

3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 127

default-a: 18 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.

default-g: 9 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.

min-scan-time

Minimum number of times a channel must be scanned before it is considered for assignment. The supported range for this setting is 0-2,147,483,647 scans. Best practices are to configure a Minimum Scan Time between 1-20 scans.

Default: 8 scans

1-2,147,483,647

Recommended Values: 1-20

8 scans

min-tx-power

Minimum effective isotropic radiated power (EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna.) from 3 to 33 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. in 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. increments. You may also specify a special value of 127 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. for regulatory minimum. This value takes into account both radio transmit power and antenna gain.

Higher power level settings may be constrained by local regulatory requirements and AP capabilities.

3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 127

default-a: 12 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.

default-g: 6 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.

mode-aware

If enabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. will turn APs into Air Monitors (AMs) if it detects higher coverage levels than necessary. This helps avoid higher levels of interference on the WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection.. Although this setting is disabled by default, you may want to enable this feature if your APs are deployed in close proximity (e.g. less than 60 feet apart).

disabled

multi-band-scan

When enabled, single-radio APs try to scan across bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. for rogue AP detection.

enabled

no

Negates any configured parameter.

ota-updates

The ota-updates option allows an AP to get information about its RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. environment from its neighbors, even the AP cannot scan. If this feature is enabled, when an AP on the network scans a foreign (non-home) channel, it sends other APs an Over-the-Air (OTA) update in an 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. management frame that contains information about the scanning AP's home channel, the current transmission EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. value of its home channel, and one-hop neighbors seen by that AP.

Default: enabled

enabled

ps-aware-scan

When enabled, the AP will not scan if Power Save is active.

disabled

radar-backoff-time

The duration, in minutes, for blacklisting AirMatch solver's channel after 2 consecutive radar detections. Setting the value to 0 disables the backoff window.

0-3600

Default: 720 minutes (12 hours)

rogue-ap-aware

When enabled, the AP will try to contain off-channel rogue APs.

disabled

scan-interval

If scanning is enabled, the scan interval defines how often the AP will leave its current channel to scan other channels in the bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. Off-channel scanning can impact client performance. Typically, the shorter the scan interval, the higher the impact on performance. If you are deploying a large number of new APs on the network, you may want to lower the Scan Interval to help those APs find their optimal settings more quickly. Raise the Scan Interval back to its default setting after the APs are functioning as desired.

Recommended Values: 0-30 seconds

0-2,147,483, 647 seconds

10 seconds

scan-mode

Select the scan mode for the AP:

all-reg-domain: The AP scans channels within all regulatory domains. This is the default setting.

reg-domain:Limit the AP scans to just the regulatory domain for that AP.

all-reg-domain

scanning

The Scanning check box enables or disables AP scanning across multiple channels. Disabling this option also disables the following scanning features:

Multi BandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. Scan

Rogue AP Aware

Voip Aware Scan

Power Save Scan

Do not disable Scanning unless you want to disable ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. and manually configure AP channel and transmission power.

enabled

video-aware-scan

As long as there is at least one video frame every 100 mSec the AP will reject an ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. scanning request. Note that for each radio interface, video frames must be defined in one of two ways:

Classify the frame as video traffic via a session ACLAccess Control List. ACL is a common way of restricting certain types of traffic on a physical port..

Enable WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). on the WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection.’s SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. profile and define a specific DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value as a video stream. Next, create a session ACLAccess Control List. ACL is a common way of restricting certain types of traffic on a physical port. to tag the video traffic with the that DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value.

enabled

voip-aware-scan

Aruba’s VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. Intelligent Call Handling (ICH) prevents any single AP from becoming congested with voice calls. When you enable ICH, you should also enable voip-aware-scan parameter in the ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profile, so the AP will not attempt to scan a different channel if one of its clients has an active VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. call. This option requires that scanning is also enabled.

disabled

Usage Guidelines

Adaptive Radio Management (ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. ) is a radio frequency (RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals.) resource allocation algorithm that allows each AP to determine the optimum channel selection and transmit power setting to minimize interference and maximize coverage and throughput. This command configures an ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profile that you apply to a radio profile for the 5 GHzGigahertz. or 2.4 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. (see rf dot11a-radio-profile or rf dot11g-radio-profile).

Default Profiles

ArubaOS includes two default ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profiles, default-a for 5 Ghz radios, and default-g for 2.4 GHzGigahertz. radios.

Channel Quality

Hybrid APs and Spectrum Monitors determine channel quality by measuring channel noise, non-Wi-Fi (interferer) utilization and duty-cycles, and certain types of Wi-Fi retries. Regular APs using ARM derive channel quality values by measuring the noise floor for that channel.

Client Match

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. client match feature continually monitors a client's RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood to provide ongoing client bandsteering and load balancing, and enhanced AP reassignment for roaming mobile clients. This feature is recommended over the legacy bandsteering and spectrum load balancing features, which, unlike client match, do not trigger AP changes for clients already associated to an AP.

 

Legacy 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps./b/g devices do not support ClientMatch. When client match is enabled on 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.-capable devices, ClientMatch overrides any settings configured for the legacy bandsteering, station handoff assist or load balancing features. 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band.-capable devices do not support the legacy bandsteering, station hand off or load balancing settings, so these APs must be managed on using client match.

When this feature is enabled on an AP, that AP is responsible for measuring the RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. health of its associated clients. The AP receives and collects information about clients in its neighborhood, and periodically sends this information to the controller. The controller aggregates and maintains a database of information about AP transmit power elvels, client transmit power levels and AP RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. levels as seen by clients. The controller shares this database with the APs (for their associated clients) and the APs use the information to compute the client-based RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood and determine which APs should be considered candidate APs for each client. When the controller receives a client steer request from an AP, the controller identifies the optimal AP candidate and manages the client’s relocation to the desired radio. This is an improvement from previous releases, where ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. was managed exclusively by APs, the without the larger perspective of the client's RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood.

The following client/AP mismatch conditions are managed by ClientMatch:

Load Balancing: Client match balances clients across APs on different channels, based upon the client load on the APs and the SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. levels the client detects from an underutilized AP. If an AP radio can support additional clients, the AP will participate in client match load balancing and clients can be directed to that AP radio, subject to predefined SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. thresholds.

Sticky Clients: ClientMatch also helps mobile clients that tend to stay associated to an AP despite low signal levels. APs using client match continually monitor the client's RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. as it roams between APs, and move the client to an AP when a better radio match can be found. This prevents mobile clients from remaining associated to an APs with less than ideal RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values., which can cause poor connectivity and reduce performance for other clients associated with that AP.

Band Steering/Band Balancing: APs using ClientMatch monitor the RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. for clients that advertise a dual-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. capability. If a client is currently associated to a 2.4 GHzGigahertz. radio and the AP detects that the client has a good RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. from the 5 Ghz radio, the controller will attempt to steer the client to the 5 Ghz radio, as long as the 5 Ghz RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. is not significantly worse than the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values., and the AP retains a suitable distribution of clients on each of its radios.

HE Steering: 802.11ax clients are best compatible with 802.11ax capable radios, resulting in better throughput and spectral efficiency. When an 802.11ax client is associated with a lower radio, ClientMatch pushes the client to the best compatible 802.11ax radio for advanced capabilities. Though STA is in good health, and is 802.11ax capable, it still sometimes connects to lower radios. ClientMatch finds a potential 802.11ax radio on the same bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. and the client moves to the new 802.11ax radio.

80MHz Dynamic Bandwidth Switch

If an AP radio uses an 80MHz channel, the radio only sends out frames out when the entire 80MHz channel is clear, even if the AP is sending only a 20MHz management frame or 40MHz data frame. As a result, throughput on the selected 80 MHzMegahertz channel can be negatively impacted if interference occurs on both 20MHz channels of the secondary 40MHz channel.

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. dynamic bandwidth switch feature allows ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. to detect the 20MHz interferers in this situation, and potentially move the AP radio to another 80MHz channel, or change the AP transmissions to 40MHz, and use the primary 40MHz channel instead.

When this feature is enabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. starts a dynamic bandwidth switch observation window if load-aware scan rejects increase, and the clear channel assignment IBSS percentage (the percentage of channel traffic sent from that AP radio) drops below the value defined by the dynamic-bw-cca-ibss-thresh parameter.

If an observation window opens, and the clear channel assignment interference threshold exceeds the value defined by the  dynamic-bw-cca- intf-thresh parameter, and the number of failed beacons from the radio exceeds the threshold defined by the dynamic-bw-beacon- failed-thresh parameter during that observation period, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. will move the AP to another available 80MHz channel with the minimum interference index. If no other 80MHz channel si available, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. downgrades the radio bandwidth to 40MHz.

ARM Scanning

The default ARM scanning interval is determined by the scan-interval parameter in the ARM profile. If the AP does not have any associated clients (or if most of its clients are inactive) ARM will dynamically readjust this default scan interval, allowing the AP obtain better information about its RF neighborhood by scanning non-home channels more frequently. If an AP attempts to scan a non-home channel but is unsuccessful, the AP will make additional attempts to rescan that channel before skipping it and continuing on to other channels.

Using Adaptive Radio Management (ARM) in a Mesh Network

When a mesh portal operates on a mesh network, the mesh portal determines the channel used by the mesh feature. When a mesh point locates an upstream mesh portal, it will scan the regulatory domain channels list to determine the channel assigned to it, for a mesh point always uses the channel selected by its mesh portal. However, if a mesh portal uses an ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profile enabled with a single-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. or multi-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. channel/power assignment and the scanning feature, the mesh portal will scan the configured channel lists and the ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. algorithm will assign the proper channel to the mesh portal.

If you are using ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. in your network, is important to note that mesh points, unlike mesh portals, do not scan channels. This means that once a mesh point has selected a mesh portal or an upstream mesh point, it will tune to this channel, form the link, and will not scan again unless the mesh link gets broken. This provides good mesh link stability, but may adversely affect system throughput in networks with mesh portals and mesh points. When ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. assigns optimal channels to mesh portals, those portals use different channels, and once the mesh network has formed and all the mesh points have selected a portal (or upstream mesh point), those mesh points will not be able to detect other portals on other channels that could offer better throughput. This type of suboptimal mesh network may form if, for example, two or three mesh points select the same mesh portal after booting, form the mesh network, and leave a nearby mesh portal without any mesh points. Again, this will not affect mesh functionality, but may affect total system throughput.

Example

The following command configures VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network.-aware scanning for the arm-profile named “voice-arm:”

(host) [mynode] (config) #rf arm-profile voice-arm

voip-aware-scan

Command History

Release

Modification

ArubaOS 8.5.0.0

The cm-he-min-signal parameter was added.

ArubaOS 8.2.0.0

The high-noise-backoff-time and radar-backoff-time parameters were added.

ArubaOS 8.0.0.0

Command introduced.

Command Information

Platforms

Licensing

Command Mode

All platforms

Base operating system.

Config mode on Mobility Master.

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