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show ap config

show ap config {ap-group <ap-group>}|{ap-name <ap-name>}|{essid <essid>}

Description

Show a large list of configuration settings for an ap-group or an individual AP.

Syntax

Parameter

Description

ap-group <ap-group>

Display configuration settings for an AP group.

ap-name <ap-name>

Display configuration settings for an AP with a specific name.

essid <essid>

Display configuration settings for an AP with a specific ESSIDExtended Service Set Identifier. ESSID refers to the ID used for identifying an extended service set.. An ESSIDExtended Service Set Identifier. ESSID refers to the ID used for identifying an extended service set. is a alphanumeric name that uniquely identifies a wireless network. If the name includes spaces, you must enclose the ESSIDExtended Service Set Identifier. ESSID refers to the ID used for identifying an extended service set. in quotation marks.

Examples

The example output below shows just some of the configuration settings displayed in the output of this command.

show ap config ap-group apgroup14

---------------------------------------------------

Parameter 802.11g 802.11a Source

--------- ------- ------- ------

LMS IP N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Backup LMS IP N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

LMS Preemption Disabled Disabled ap system-profile "default"

LMS Hold-down Period 600 sec 600 sec ap system-profile "default"

Master controller IP address N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

RF Band g g ap system-profile "default"

Double Encrypt Disabled Disabled ap system-profile "default"

Native VLAN ID 1 1 ap system-profile "default"

SAP MTU N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Bootstrap threshold 8 8 ap system-profile "default"

Request Retry Interval 10 sec 10 sec ap system-profile "default"

Maximum Request Retries 10 10 ap system-profile "default"

Keepalive Interval 60 sec 60 sec ap system-profile "default"

Dump Server N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Telnet Disabled Disabled ap system-profile "default"

FIPS enable Disabled Disabled ap system-profile "default"

SNMP sysContact N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

RFprotect Server IP N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

RFprotect Backup Server IP N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

AeroScout RTLS Server N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

RTLS Server configuration N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Server VLAN N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Server Id 192.168.11.1 192.168.11.1 ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Default Router 192.168.11.1 192.168.11.1 ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Pool Start 192.168.11.2 192.168.11.2 ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Pool End 192.168.11.254 192.168.11.254 ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Pool Netmask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 ap system-profile "default"

Remote-AP DHCP Lease Time 0 days 0 days ap system-profile "default"

Heartbeat DSCP 0 0 ap system-profile "default"

Session ACL N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Image URL N/A N/A ap system-profile "default"

Maintenance Mode Disabled Disabled ap system-profile "default"

...

 

The output of this command includes the following parameters.

Parameter

Description

LMS IP

The IPv4 address of the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. - the Aruba managed device which is responsible for terminating user traffic from the APs, and processing and forwarding the traffic to the wired network.

LMS IPv6

The IPv6 address of the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. - the Aruba managed device which is responsible for terminating user traffic from the APs, and processing and forwarding the traffic to the wired network.

Backup LMS IP

For networks with multiple managed devices, this parameter displays the IPv4 address of a backup to the IP address specified with the lms-ip parameter.

Backup LMS IP

For networks with multiple managed devices, this parameter displays the IPv6 address of a backup to the IP address specified with the lms-ip parameter.

LMS Preemption

When this parameter is enabled, the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network.  automatically reverts to the primary LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. IP address when it becomes available.

LMS Hold-down Period

Time, in seconds, that the primary LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. must be available before an AP returns to that LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. after failover.

Number of IPsec retries

Shows the number of times the AP will attempt to recreate an IPsecInternet Protocol security. IPsec is a protocol suite for secure IP communications that authenticates and encrypts each IP packet in a communication session. tunnel with Mobility Master before the AP will reboot. The supported range is

0-1000 retries, and the default value is 360. A value of 0 disables the

reboot.

LED operation mode

The operating mode for the LEDs (11n APs only)

normal: Normal mode

off: All LEDs off

Master controller IP address

For networks with multiple managed devices, this parameter displays the IP address of Mobility Master.

RF Band

For dual-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. radios, this parameter displays the RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. in which the AP should operate:

g = 2.4 GHzGigahertz.

a = 5 GHzGigahertz.

Double Encrypt

This parameter applies only to remote APsRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link.. Double encryption is used for traffic to and from a wireless client that is connected to a tunneled SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network.. When enabled, all traffic is re-encrypted in the IPsecInternet Protocol security. IPsec is a protocol suite for secure IP communications that authenticates and encrypts each IP packet in a communication session. tunnel. When disabled, the wireless frame is only encapsulated inside the IPsecInternet Protocol security. IPsec is a protocol suite for secure IP communications that authenticates and encrypts each IP packet in a communication session. tunnel.

Native VLAN ID

Native VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN. for bridge mode virtual APs (frames on the native VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN. are not tagged with 802.1q tags).

SAP MTU

MTUMaximum Transmission Unit. MTU is the largest size packet or frame specified in octets (eight-bit bytes) that can be sent in networks such as the Internet. size, in bytes. This value describes the greatest amount of data that can be transferred in one physical frame.

Bootstrap threshold

Number of consecutive missed heartbeats on a GREGeneric Routing Encapsulation. GRE is an IP encapsulation protocol that is used to transport packets over a network. tunnel (heartbeats are sent once per second on each tunnel) before an AP rebootstraps. On the managed device, the GREGeneric Routing Encapsulation. GRE is an IP encapsulation protocol that is used to transport packets over a network. tunnel timeout is 1.5 x bootstrap-threshold; the tunnel is torn down after this number of seconds of inactivity on the tunnel.

Request Retry Interval

Interval, in seconds, between the first and second retries of AP-generated requests. If the configured interval is less than 30 seconds, the interval for subsequent retries is increased up to 30 seconds.

Maximum Request Retries

Maximum number of times to retry AP-generated requests, including keepaliveSignal sent at periodic intervals from one device to another to verify that the link between the two devices is working. If no reply is received, data will be sent by a different path until the link is restored. A keepalive can also be used to indicate that the connection should be preserved so that the receiving device does not consider it timed out and drop it. messages. After the maximum number of retries, the AP either reboots or tries the IP

address specified by the backup LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. IP address (if configured).

Keepalive Interval

Time, in seconds, between keepaliveSignal sent at periodic intervals from one device to another to verify that the link between the two devices is working. If no reply is received, data will be sent by a different path until the link is restored. A keepalive can also be used to indicate that the connection should be preserved so that the receiving device does not consider it timed out and drop it. messages from the AP

Dump Server

(For debugging purposes.) Displays the server to receive the core dump generated if an AP process crashes.

Telnet

Reports whether telnet access the AP is enabled or disabled.

SNMP sysContact

SNMPSimple Network Management Protocol. SNMP is a TCP/IP standard protocol for managing devices on IP networks. Devices that typically support SNMP include routers, switches, servers, workstations, printers, modem racks, and more. It is used mostly in network management systems to monitor network-attached devices for conditions that warrant administrative attention.  system contact information.

AeroScout RTLS Server

Displays whether or not the AP will send RFIDRadio Frequency Identification. RFID uses radio waves to automatically identify and track the information stored on a tag attached to an object. tag information to an AeroScout RTLSReal-Time Location Systems. RTLS automatically identifies and tracks the location of objects or people in real time, usually within a building or other contained area. server.

RTLS Server configuration

Displays whether or not the AP will send RFIDRadio Frequency Identification. RFID uses radio waves to automatically identify and track the information stored on a tag attached to an object. tag information to an RTLSReal-Time Location Systems. RTLS automatically identifies and tracks the location of objects or people in real time, usually within a building or other contained area. server.

Remote-AP DHCP Server VLAN

Shows the VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN. ID of the remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link. DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  server used when the managed device is unreachable.

Remote-AP DHCP Server Id

Shows the IP Address of the DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. Server.

Remote-AP DHCP Default Router

Shows the IP Address of the DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  Default Router.

Remote-AP DHCP Pool Start

Shows the IP Address used as start of DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  Pool.

Remote-AP DHCP Pool End

Shows the IP Address used as end of DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  Pool.

Remote-AP DHCP Pool Netmask

Shows the netmaskNetmask is a 32-bit mask used for segregating IP address into subnets. Netmask defines the class and range of IP addresses. of DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  Pool.

Remote-AP DHCP Lease Time

Shows the length of leases, in days (0 means infinite).

Remote-AP uplink total bandwidth

This is the total reserved uplink bandwidth (in Kilobits per second)

Remote-AP bw reservation

Session ACLsAccess Control List. ACL is a common way of restricting certain types of traffic on a physical port. with uplink bandwidth reservation in kilobits per second. You can specify up to three session ACLsAccess Control List. ACL is a common way of restricting certain types of traffic on a physical port. to reserve uplink bandwidth.

Heartbeat DSCP

DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value of AP heartbeats (0-63).

Session ACL

Shows the ACLAccess Control List. ACL is a common way of restricting certain types of traffic on a physical port. applied on the uplink of a remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link..

Maintenance Mode

Shows if Maintenance mode is enabled or disabled. If enabled, APs stop flooding unnecessary traps and syslog messages to NMSNetwork Management System. NMS is a set of hardware and/or software tools that allow an IT professional to supervise the individual components of a network within a larger network management framework. systems or network operations centers when deploying, maintaining, or upgrading the network. The managed device still generates debug syslog messages if debug logging is enabled.

Remote-AP Local Network Access

Enable or disable local network access across VLANsVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN. in a Remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link..

Radio enable

Shows if the AP’s radio is enabled or disabled.

Mode

Shows the operating modes for the AP.

ap-mode: Device provides transparent, secure, high-speed data communications between wireless network devices and the wired LANLocal Area Network. A LAN is a network of connected devices within a distinct geographic area such as an office or a commercial establishment and share a common communications line or wireless link to a server..

am-mode: Device behaves as an AMAir Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. to collect statistics, monitor traffic, detect intrusions, enforce security policies, balance traffic load, self-heal coverage gaps, etc.

spectrum-mode: Device behaves as a spectrum monitor, sending spectrum analysis data to the managed device. Spectrum monitors do not serve clients.

 

High throughput enable (radio)

Shows if high-throughput (802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.) features on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. are enabled or disabled.

Channel

Shows the channel number for the AP’s 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. physical layer.

Beacon Period

Shows the time, in milliseconds, between successive beacon transmissions. The beacon advertises the AP’s presence, identity, and radio characteristics to wireless clients.

Beacon Regulate

Enabling this setting introduces randomness in the beacon generation so that multiple APs on the same channel do not send beacons at the same time, which causes collisions over the air.

Transmit EIRP

Shows the current transmission power level.

Advertise 802.11d and 802.11h Capabilities

This column reports whether or not the AP will advertise its 802.11d802.11d is a wireless network communications specification for use in countries where systems using other standards in the 802.11 family are not allowed to operate. Configuration can be fine-tuned at the Media Access Control (MAC) layer level to comply with the rules of the country or district in which the network is to be used. Rules are subject to variation and include allowed frequencies, allowed power levels, and allowed signal bandwidth. 802.11d facilitates global roaming. (Country Information) and 802.11h802.11h is intended to resolve interference issues introduced by the use of 802.11a in some locations, particularly with military Radar systems and medical devices. Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) detects the presence of other devices on a channel and automatically switches the network to another channel if and when such signals are detected. Transmit Power Control (TPC) reduces the radio frequency (RF) output power of each network transmitter to a level that minimizes the risk of interference. (TPCTransmit Power Control. TPC is a part of the 802.11h amendment. It is used to regulate the power levels used by 802.11a radio cards.) capabilities.

TPC Power

The transmit power advertised in the TPCTransmit Power Control. TPC is a part of the 802.11h amendment. It is used to regulate the power levels used by 802.11a radio cards. IE of beacons and probe responses. Range: 0-51 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.

Spectrum Load Balancing

The Spectrum Load Balancing feature helps optimize network resources by balancing clients across channels, regardless of whether the AP or the managed device is responding to the wireless clients' probe requests.

If enabled, the managed device compares whether or not an AP has more clients than its neighboring APs on other channels. If an AP’s client load is at or over a predetermined threshold as compared to its immediate neighbors, or if a neighboring Aruba AP on another channel does not have any clients, load balancing will be enabled on that AP. This feature is disabled by default.

Spectrum Load Balancing mode

Spectrum Load Balancing Mode allows control over how to balance clients. Select one of the following options:

channel: Channel-based load-balancing balances clients across channels. This is the default load-balancing mode

radio: Radio-based load-balancing balances clients across APs

Spectrum load balancing update interval

 

This value determines how often spectrum load balancing calculations are made (in seconds). The default value is 30 seconds.

Advertised regulatory max EIRP

A cap for an radio’s maximum EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna.. Even if the regulatory approved maximum for a given channel is higher than this EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. cap, the AP radio using this profile will advertise only this capped maximum EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. in its radio beacons.

Spectrum load balancing domain

Define a spectrum load balancing domain to manually create RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhoods.

This option creates RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood information for networks that have disabled ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. scanning and channel assignment.

If spectrum load balancing is enabled in a 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. radio profile but the spectrum load balancing domain is not defined, ArubaOS uses ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. to calculate RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhoods.

If spectrum load balancing is enabled in a 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. radio profile and a spectrum load balancing domain isalso defined, AP radios belonging to the same spectrum load balancing domain will be considered part of the same RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood for load balancing, and will not recognize RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhoods defined by ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. .

Rx sensitivity tuning based channel reuse

The channel reuse feature can operate in either of the following three modes; static, dynamic or disable. (This feature is disabled by default.)

Static mode: This mode of operation is a coverage-based adaptation of the CCAClear Channel Assessment. In wireless networks, the CCA method detects if a channel is occupied or clear, and determines if the channel is available for data transmission. thresholds. In the static mode of operation, the CCAClear Channel Assessment. In wireless networks, the CCA method detects if a channel is occupied or clear, and determines if the channel is available for data transmission. is adjusted according to the configured transmission power level on the AP, so as the AP transmit power decreases as the CCAClear Channel Assessment. In wireless networks, the CCA method detects if a channel is occupied or clear, and determines if the channel is available for data transmission. threshold increases, and vice versa.

Dynamic mode: In this mode, the CCAClear Channel Assessment. In wireless networks, the CCA method detects if a channel is occupied or clear, and determines if the channel is available for data transmission. thresholds are based on channel loads, and take into account the location of the associated clients. When you set the Channel Reuse This feature is automatically enabled when the wireless medium around the AP is busy greater than half the time. When this mode is enabled, the CCAClear Channel Assessment. In wireless networks, the CCA method detects if a channel is occupied or clear, and determines if the channel is available for data transmission. threshold adjusts to accommodate transmissions between the AP its most distant associated client.

Disable mode: This mode does not support the tuning of the CCAClear Channel Assessment. In wireless networks, the CCA method detects if a channel is occupied or clear, and determines if the channel is available for data transmission. Detect Threshold.

Rx sensitivity threshold

RX Sensitivity Tuning Based Channel Reuse Threshold, in -dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

If the Rx Sensitivity Tuning Based Channel reuse feature is set to static mode, this parameter manually sets the AP’s Rx sensitivity threshold (in -dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors.). The AP will filter out and ignore weak signals that are below the channel threshold signal strength.

If the value is set to zero, the feature will automatically determine an appropriate threshold

Non 802.11a interference Immunity

The value for 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. Interference Immunity. This parameter sets the interference immunity on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

The default setting for this parameter is level 2. When performance drops due to interference from non-802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. interferes (such as DECT or Bluetooth devices), the level can be increased up to level 5 for improved performance. However, increasing the level makes the AP slightly “deaf” to its surroundings, causing the AP to lose a small amount of range.

The levels for this parameter are:

Level-0: no ANI adaptation.

Level-1: noise immunity only.

Level-2: noise and spur immunity. This is the default setting

Level-3: level 2 and weak OFDMOrthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing. OFDM is a scheme for encoding digital data on multiple carrier frequencies. immunity.

Level-4: level 3 and FIR immunity.

Level-5: disable PHY reporting.

Enable CSA

Displays whether or not the AP has enabled CSAs for 802.11h802.11h is intended to resolve interference issues introduced by the use of 802.11a in some locations, particularly with military Radar systems and medical devices. Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) detects the presence of other devices on a channel and automatically switches the network to another channel if and when such signals are detected. Transmit Power Control (TPC) reduces the radio frequency (RF) output power of each network transmitter to a level that minimizes the risk of interference..

CSA Count

Number of channel switch announcements that must be sent before the AP will switch to a new channel.

Management Frame Throttle interval

Average interval that rate limiting management frames are sent from this radio, in seconds. If this column displays a zero rate limiting is disabled for this AP.

Management Frame Throttle Limit

Maximum number of management frames that can come from this radio in each throttle interval.

ARM/WIDS Override

Shows if ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. and Wireless IDSIntrusion Detection System. IDS monitors a network or systems for malicious activity or policy violations and reports its findings to the management system deployed in the network. functions are enabled or disabled. If a radio is configured to operate in AMAir Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. mode, then these functions are always enabled, regardless of this option.

Protection for 802.11b Clients

Displays whether or not protection for 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps. clients is enabled or disabled.

Maximum Distance

Maximum distance between a client and an AP or between a mesh point and a mesh portal, in meters. This value is used to derive ACK and CTSClear to Send. The CTS refers to the data transmission and protection mechanism used by the 802.11 wireless networking protocol to prevent frame collision occurrences. See RTS. timeout times. A value of 0 specifies default settings for this parameter, where timeouts are only modified for outdoor mesh radios which use a distance of 16 km.

The upper limit for this parameter varies, depending on the 20/40 MHzMegahertz mode for a 2.4 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. radio:

20 MHzMegahertz mode: 54 km

40 MHzMegahertz mode: 24 km

If you configure a value above the supported maximum, the maximum supported value will be used instead. Values below 600 m will use default settings.

Spectrum Monitoring

When this parameter is enabled, it turns an AP in ap-mode into a hybrid AP. An AP in hybrid AP mode will continue to serve clients as an access point while it scans and analyzes spectrum analysis data for a single radio channel.

Assignment

Displays whether or not ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. channel and power assignment has been enabled or disabled.

Allowed bands for 40MHz channels

Forty MHzMegahertz channels may be used on the specified radio bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. (802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network.).

Client Aware

Shows if the client aware feature has been enabled or disabled for this AP. If enabled, AP will not change channels when there are active clients.

Max Tx Power

Maximum transmission power for this AP, in dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

Min Tx Power

Minimum transmission power for this AP, in dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

Multi Band Scan

Shows if the multi-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. scan feature has been enabled or disabled on this AP. If enabled, single-radio APs will try to scan across bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. for Rogue AP detection.

Rogue AP Aware

Shows if the rogue AP awareness feature has been enabled or disabled on this AP. If enabled, the AP will try to contain off-channel Rogue APs.

Scan Interval

This parameter indicates, in seconds, how often the AP will leave its current channel to scan other channels in the bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. if scanning is enabled.

Active Scan

Displays whether or not the active scan feature is enabled.

NOTE: This option elicits more information from nearby APs, but also creates additional management traffic on the network. Active Scan is disabled by default, and should not be enabled except under the direct supervision of Aruba Support.

Scanning

Shows if scanning is enabled or disabled for this AP. If this option is disabled, the following other options will also be disabled:

Multi BandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. Scan

Rogue AP Aware

Voip Aware Scan

Power Save Scan

VoIP Aware Scan

Shows if VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. aware scanning is enabled or disabled. If you use voice handsets in the WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection., VoIP Aware Scan should be enabled in the ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profile so the AP will not attempt to scan a different channel if one of its clients has an active VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. call. This option requires that Scanning is also enabled.

Power Save Aware Scan

Shows if the power save aware scan is enabled or disabled. If enabled, the AP will not scan a different channel if it has one or more clients and is in power save mode.

Default: enabled

Ideal Coverage Index

The Aruba coverage index metric is a weighted calculation based on the RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. coverage for all Aruba APs and neighboring APs on a specified channel. The Ideal Coverage Index specifies the ideal coverage that an AP should try to achieve on its channel. The denser the AP deployment, the lower this value should be.

Acceptable Coverage Index

For multi-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. implementations, the Acceptable Coverage Index specifies the minimal coverage an AP it should achieve on its channel. The denser the AP deployment, the lower this value should be.

Free Channel Index

The current free channel index value. The Aruba Interference index metric measures interference for a specified channel and its surrounding channels. This value is calculated and weighted for all APs on those channels (including 3rd-party APs).

An AP will only move to a new channel if the new channel has a lower interference index value than the current channel. Free Channel Index specifies the required difference between the two interference index values before the AP moves to the new channel. The lower this value, the more likely it is that the AP will move to the new channel.

Backoff Time

After an AP changes channel or power settings, it waits for this backoff time interval before it asks for a new channel or power setting.

Error Rate Threshold

The minimum percentage of PHY errors and MACMedia Access Control. A MAC address is a unique identifier assigned to network interfaces for communications on a network. errors in the channel that will trigger a channel change.

Error Rate Wait Time

Minimum time in seconds the error rate on the AP has to exceed its defined error rate threshold before it triggers a channel change.

Noise Threshold

Maximum level of noise in a channel that triggers a channel change.

Noise Wait Time

Minimum time in seconds the noise level has to exceed the Noise Threshold before it triggers a channel change on the AP.

Minimum Scan Time

Minimum number of times a channel must be scanned before it is considered for assignment. Best practices are to configure a Minimum Scan Time between 1-20 scans.

Load aware Scan Threshold

The Load Aware Scan Threshold is the traffic throughput level an AP must reach before it stops scanning. Load aware ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. preserves network resources during periods of high traffic by temporarily halting ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. scanning if the load for the AP gets too high.

Mode Aware Arm

Shows if the mode-aware ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. feature has been enabled or disabled for this AP. If enabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. will turn the AP into an AMs if it detects higher coverage levels than necessary. This helps avoid higher levels of interference on the WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection.. Although this setting is disabled by default, you may want to enable this feature if your APs are deployed in close proximity (e.g. less than 60 feet apart).

Scan mode

Identifies the scan mode for the AP.

all-reg-domain: The AP scans channels within all regulatory domains. This is the default setting.

reg-domain:Limit the AP scans to just the regulatory domain for that AP.

40 MHz intolerance

The specified setting allows ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. to determine if 40 MHzMegahertz mode of operation is allowed on the 5 GHzGigahertz. or 2.4 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. only, on both frequency bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation., or on neither frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation..

Honor 40 MHz intolerance

Shows if 40 MHzMegahertz intolerance is enabled or disabled. If enabled, the radio will stop using the 40 MHzMegahertz channels if the 40 MHzMegahertz intolerance indication is received from another AP or station.

Legacy station workaround

Shows if interoperability for misbehaving legacy stations is enabled or disabled.

SSID enable

Shows if the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. is enabled or disabled

ESSID

Name that uniquely identifies the Extended SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network..

Encryption

Encryption type used on this AP.

DTIM Interval

Shows the interval, in milliseconds, between the sending of DTIMs in the beacon. This is the maximum number of beacon cycles before unacknowledged network broadcasts are flushed.

Basic Rates

Lists supported 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. rates, in MbpsMegabits per second, that are advertised in beacon frames and probe responses from this AP.

Transmit Rates

Lists 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. rates at which the AP is allowed to send data. The actual transmit rate depends on what the client is able to handle, based on information sent at the time of association and on the current error or loss rate of the client.

Station Ageout Time

Time, in seconds, that a client is allowed to remain idle before being aged out.

Max Transmit Attempts

Maximum number of retries allowed for the AP to send a frame

RTS Threshold

Wireless clients transmitting frames larger than this threshold must issue RTSRequest to Send. RTS refers to the data transmission and protection mechanism used by the 802.11 wireless networking protocol to prevent frame collision occurrences. See CTS. and wait for the AP to respond with CTSClear to Send. The CTS refers to the data transmission and protection mechanism used by the 802.11 wireless networking protocol to prevent frame collision occurrences. See RTS. . This helps prevent mid-air collisions for wireless clients that are not within wireless peer range and cannot detect when other wireless clients are transmitting.

Short Preamble

Shows if a short preamble for 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g radios is enabled or disabled for this AP. Network performance may be higher when short preamble is enabled. In mixed radio environments, some 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps. wireless client stations may experience difficulty associating with the AP using short preamble. To use only long preamble, disable short preamble. Legacy client devices that use only long preamble generally can be updated to support short preamble.

Max Associations

Maximum number of wireless clients allowed to associate to the AP

Wireless Multimedia (WMM)

Shows if Wireless Multimedia (WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK).) is enabled or disabled for this AP. WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). provides prioritization of specific traffic relative to other traffic in the network

Wireless Multimedia U-APSD (WMM-UAPSD) Powersave

Shows if Wireless Multimedia (WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK).) UAPSD powersave is enabled or disabled.

WMM TSPEC Min Inactivity Interval

Displays the minimum inactivity time-out threshold of WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). traffic for this AP.

DSCP mapping for WMM voice AC

Displays the DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value used to map WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). voice traffic.

DSCP mapping for WMM video AC

Displays the DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value used to map WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). video traffic.

DSCP mapping for WMM best-effort AC

Displays the DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value used to map WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). best-effort traffic

 

DSCP mapping for WMM background AC

Displays the DSCPDifferentiated Services Code Point. DSCP is a 6-bit packet header value used for traffic classification and priority assignment. value used to map WMMWi-Fi Multimedia. WMM is also known as WME. It refers to a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard. It provides basic QoS features to IEEE 802.11 networks. WMM prioritizes traffic according to four ACs: voice (AC_VO), video (AC_VI), best effort (AC_BE), and background (AC_BK). background traffic.

902il Compatibility Mode

Shows if 902il compatibility mode is enabled or disabled. (This parameter only needs to be enabled for APs with associated clients using NTT DoCoMo 902iL phones.)

Hide SSID

Shows if the feature to hide a SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. name in beacon frames is enabled or disabled.

Deny_Broadcast Probes

When a client sends a broadcast probe request frame to search for all available SSIDsService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network., this option controls whether or not the system responds for this SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network.. When enabled, no response is sent and clients have to know the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. in order to associate to the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network.. When disabled, a probe response frame is sent for this SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network..

Local Probe Response

Shows if local probe response is enabled or disabled on the AP. If this option is enabled, the AP is responsible for sending 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. probe responses to wireless clients’ probe requests. If this option is disabled, then the controller sends the 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. probe responses

Disable Probe Retry

If disabled, the AP will not resend probes if it does not get a response.

Battery Boost

Shows if the battery boost feature is enabled or disabled for the AP. If enabled, this feature converts multicast traffic to unicast before delivery to the client, thus allowing you to set a longer DTIMDelivery Traffic Indication Message. DTIM is a kind of traffic indication map. A DTIM interval determines when the APs must deliver broadcast and multicast frames to their associated clients in power save mode. interval. The longer interval keeps associated wireless clients from activating their radios for multicast indication and delivery, leaving them in power-save mode longer and thus lengthening battery life

Drop Broadcast and Multicast

If this feature is enabled on an AP, it drops all downstream broadcast or multicast traffic to increase battery life.

WEP Key 1

Displays the static WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. key (1 of 4).

WEP Key 2

Displays the static WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. key (2 of 4).

WEP Key 3

Displays the static WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. key (3 of 4).

WEP Key 4

Displays the static WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. key (4 of 4).

WEP Transmit Key Index

Displays the key index that specifies which static WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. key is to be used.

WPA Hexkey

Displays the WPAWi-Fi Protected Access. WPA is an interoperable wireless security specification subset of the IEEE 802.11 standard. This standard provides authentication capabilities and uses TKIP for data encryption. PSKPre-shared key. A unique shared secret that was previously shared between two parties by using a secure channel. This is used with WPA security, which requires the owner of a network to provide a passphrase to users for network access. .

WPA Passphrase

Displays the WPAWi-Fi Protected Access. WPA is an interoperable wireless security specification subset of the IEEE 802.11 standard. This standard provides authentication capabilities and uses TKIP for data encryption. passphrase with which the AP generates a PSKPre-shared key. A unique shared secret that was previously shared between two parties by using a secure channel. This is used with WPA security, which requires the owner of a network to provide a passphrase to users for network access. .

Maximum Transmit Failures

Display the maximum number of transmission failures allowed before the client gives up.

BC/MC Rate Optimization

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled scanning of all active stations currently associated to that AP to select the lowest transmission rate for broadcast and multicast frames. This option only applies to broadcast and multicast data frames; 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. management frames are transmitted at the lowest configured rate.

Rate Optimization for delivering EAPOL frames

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled rate optimization for delivering EAPOL frames.

Strict Spectralink Voice Protocol (SVP)

Shows if strict SVPSpectraLink Voice Priority. SVP is an open, straightforward QoS approach that has been adopted by most leading vendors of WLAN APs. SVP favors isochronous voice packets over asynchronous data packets when contending for the wireless medium and when transmitting packets onto the wired LAN. is enabled or disabled.

802.11g Beacon Rate

Sets the beacon rate for 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. for APs use a DASDistributed Antenna System. DAS is a network of antenna nodes strategically placed around a geographical area or structure for additional cellular coverage. . Using this parameter in normal operation may cause connectivity problems.

802.11a Beacon Rate

Sets the beacon rate for 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. for APs use a DASDistributed Antenna System. DAS is a network of antenna nodes strategically placed around a geographical area or structure for additional cellular coverage. . Using this parameter in normal operation may cause connectivity problems.

Advertise QBSS Load IE

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled the advertising of QBSS in the load IE.

High throughput enable (SSID)

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled the use of its high-throughput SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. in 40 MHzMegahertz mode.

40 MHz channel usage

Determines if this high-throughput SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. allows high-throughput (802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.) stations to associate.

MPDU Aggregation

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled MDPU aggregation.

Max transmitted A-MPDU size

Shows the maximum size, in bytes, of an A-MPDUMAC Protocol Data Unit. MPDU is a message exchanged between MAC entities in a communication system based on the layered OSI model. that can be sent on the AP’s high-throughput SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network..

Max received A-MPDU size

Shows the maximum size, in bytes, of an A-MPDUMAC Protocol Data Unit. MPDU is a message exchanged between MAC entities in a communication system based on the layered OSI model. that can be received on the AP’s high-throughput SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network..

Min MPDU start spacing

Displays the minimum time between the start of adjacent MDPUs within an aggregate MDPU, in microseconds.

Supported MCS set

Comma-separated list of MCSModulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. values or ranges of values to be supported on this high-throughput SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network..

Short guard interval in 20 MHz mode

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled use of short guard interval in 20 MHzMegahertz mode of operation.

Short guard interval in 40 MHz mode

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled use of short guard interval in 40 MHzMegahertz mode of operation.

Maximum number of spatial stream usable for STBC transmission

Controls the maximum number of spatial streams usable for STBCSpace-Time Block Coding. STBC is a technique used in wireless communications to transmit multiple copies of a data stream across a number of antennas and to exploit the various received versions of the data to improve the reliability of data transfer. transmission. 0 disables STBCSpace-Time Block Coding. STBC is a technique used in wireless communications to transmit multiple copies of a data stream across a number of antennas and to exploit the various received versions of the data to improve the reliability of data transfer. transmission, 1 uses STBCSpace-Time Block Coding. STBC is a technique used in wireless communications to transmit multiple copies of a data stream across a number of antennas and to exploit the various received versions of the data to improve the reliability of data transfer. for MCSModulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. 0-7. Higher MCSModulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. values are not supported. (Supported on the 130 Series, 170 Series and AP‑105 only. The configured value will be adjusted based on AP capabilities.)

Minimum number of spatial stream usable for STBC transmission

Controls the maximum number of spatial streams usable for STBCSpace-Time Block Coding. STBC is a technique used in wireless communications to transmit multiple copies of a data stream across a number of antennas and to exploit the various received versions of the data to improve the reliability of data transfer. reception. 0 disables STBCSpace-Time Block Coding. STBC is a technique used in wireless communications to transmit multiple copies of a data stream across a number of antennas and to exploit the various received versions of the data to improve the reliability of data transfer. reception, 1 uses STBCSpace-Time Block Coding. STBC is a technique used in wireless communications to transmit multiple copies of a data stream across a number of antennas and to exploit the various received versions of the data to improve the reliability of data transfer. for MCSModulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. 0-7. Higher MCSModulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. values are not supported. (Supported on the 130 Series, 170 Series, and AP‑105 only. The configured value will be adjusted based on AP capabilities.)

Legacy stations

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled the legacy stations option, which controls whether or not legacy (non-HTHigh Throughput. IEEE 802.11n is an HT WLAN standard that aims to achieve physical data rates of close to 600 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands.) stations are allowed to associate with the AP’s SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network.. By default, legacy stations are allowed to associate.

NOTE: This setting has no effect on a BSSBasic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. in which HTHigh Throughput. IEEE 802.11n is an HT WLAN standard that aims to achieve physical data rates of close to 600 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. support is not available.

Allow weak encryption

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled the weak encryption option.

The use of TKIPTemporal Key Integrity Protocol. A part of the WPA encryption standard for wireless networks. TKIP is the next-generation Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) that provides per-packet key mixing to address the flaws encountered in the WEP standard. or WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. for unicast traffic forces the use of legacy transmissions rates. Disabling this mode prevents the association of stations using TKIPTemporal Key Integrity Protocol. A part of the WPA encryption standard for wireless networks. TKIP is the next-generation Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) that provides per-packet key mixing to address the flaws encountered in the WEP standard. or WEPWired Equivalent Privacy. WEP is a security protocol that is specified in 802.11b and is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN. for unicast traffic. This mode is disabled by default.

Virtual AP enable

WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. profiles configure WLANsWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. in the form of virtual AP profiles. This parameter shows if the AP has enabled or disabled virtual APs.

Allowed band

Shows the bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.(s) on which to use the virtual AP:

a—802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. only (5 GHzGigahertz.)

g—802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. only (2.4 GHzGigahertz.)

all—both 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. and 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. (5 GHzGigahertz. and 2.4 GHzGigahertz.)

VLAN

Shows the VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN.(s) into which users are placed in order to obtain an IP address.

Forward mode

Shows the current forward mode (tunnel, bridge, split-tunnel, or decrypt-tunnel) for the virtual AP.

This parameter controls whether 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. frames are tunneled to the controller using GREGeneric Routing Encapsulation. GRE is an IP encapsulation protocol that is used to transport packets over a network., bridged into the local EthernetEthernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. LANLocal Area Network. A LAN is a network of connected devices within a distinct geographic area such as an office or a commercial establishment and share a common communications line or wireless link to a server. (for remote APsRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link.), or a combination thereof depending on the destination (corporate traffic goes to the controller, and Internet access remains local).

When an AP is configured to use the decrypt-tunnel forwarding mode, that AP decrypts and decapsulates all 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. frames from a client and sends the 802.3 frames through the GREGeneric Routing Encapsulation. GRE is an IP encapsulation protocol that is used to transport packets over a network. tunnel to the controller, which then applies firewallFirewall is a network security system used for preventing unauthorized access to or from a private network. policies to the user traffic. When the controller sends traffic to a client, the controller sends 802.3 traffic through the GREGeneric Routing Encapsulation. GRE is an IP encapsulation protocol that is used to transport packets over a network. tunnel to the AP, which then converts it to encrypted 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. and forwards to the client.

Only 802.1X802.1X is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control designed to enhance 802.11 WLAN security. 802.1X provides an authentication framework that allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority. authentication is supported when configuring bridge or split tunnel mode.

Deny time range

Shows the time range for which the AP will deny access for a virtual AP.

Mobile IP

Shows if IP mobility has been enabled or disabled for the virtual AP.

HA Discovery on-association

If enabled, home agent discovery is triggered on client association instead of home agent discovery based on traffic from client. Mobility on association can speed up roaming and improve connectivity for clients that do not send many uplink packets to trigger mobility (VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. clients). Best practice is to keep this parameter disabled as it increases IP mobility control traffic between controllers in the same mobility domain. Enable this parameter only when voice issues are observed in VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. clients.

NOTE: ha-disc-onassoc parameter works only when IP mobility is enabled and configured on the controller. For more information about this parameter, refer to Home Agent Discovery on Association

DoS Prevention

Shows the status of the Dos Prevention option. If enabled, virtual APs ignore deauthentication frames from clients. This prevents a successful deauth attack from being carried out against the AP. This does not affect third-party APs.

Station Blacklisting

Shows if the virtual AP has enabled or disabled detection of DoSDenial of Service. DoS is any type of attack where the attackers send excessive messages to flood traffic and thereby preventing the legitimate users from accessing the service. attacks, such as ping or SYN floods, that are not spoofed deauth attacks.

Blacklist Time

Shows the number of seconds that a client will be quarantined from the network after being blacklisted.

Authentication Failure Blacklist Time

Shows the time, in seconds, a client is blocked if it fails repeated authentication. If the virtual AP shows a value of 0, a blacklisted client is blocked indefinitely.

Fast Roaming

Shows if the AP has enabled or disabled fast roaming.

Strict Compliance

If enabled, the virtual AP denies client association requests if the AP and client station have no common rates defined. Some legacy client stations which are not fully 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing.-compliant may not include their configured rates in their association requests. Such non-compliant stations may have difficulty associating with APs unless strict compliance is disabled.

VLAN Mobility

Shows if a virtual AP has enabled or disabled VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN. (Layer-2) mobility

Remote-AP Operation

Shows when the virtual AP operates on a remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link.:

always—Permanently enables the virtual AP (Bridge Mode only). This option can be used for non-802.1X802.1X is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control designed to enhance 802.11 WLAN security. 802.1X provides an authentication framework that allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority. bridge VAPs.

backup—Enables the virtual AP if the remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link. cannot connect to the controller (Bridge Mode only). This option can be used for non-802.1X802.1X is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control designed to enhance 802.11 WLAN security. 802.1X provides an authentication framework that allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority. bridge VAPs.

persistent—Permanently enables the virtual AP after the remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link. initially connects to the controller (Bridge Mode only). This option can be used for any (Open/PSKPre-shared key. A unique shared secret that was previously shared between two parties by using a secure channel. This is used with WPA security, which requires the owner of a network to provide a passphrase to users for network access. /802.1X802.1X is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control designed to enhance 802.11 WLAN security. 802.1X provides an authentication framework that allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority.) bridge VAPs.

standard—Enables the virtual AP when the remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link. connects to the controller. This option can be used for any (bridge/split-tunnel/tunnel/d-tunnel) VAPs.

Convert Broadcast ARP requests to unicast

If this option is enabled, all broadcast ARPAddress Resolution Protocol. ARP is used for mapping IP network address to the hardware MAC address of a device. requests are converted to unicast and sent directly to the client. You can check the status of this option using the show ap active and the show datapath tunnel command. If enabled, the output will display the letter a in the flags column.

Band Steering

Shows if bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.-steering has been enabled or disabled for a virtual AP.

ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. ’s bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering feature encourages dual-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. capable clients to stay on the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. on dual-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. APs. This frees up resources on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. for single bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. clients like VoIPVoice over IP. VoIP allows transmission of voice and multimedia content over an IP network. phones.

BandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering reduces co-channel interference and increases available bandwidth for dual-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. clients, because there are more channels on the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. than on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. Dual-bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.-capable clients may see even greater bandwidth improvements, because the bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering feature will automatically select between 40 MHzMegahertz or 20 MHzMegahertz channels in 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. networks. This feature is disabled by default, and must be enabled in a Virtual AP profile.

Related Commands

Command

Description

ap system-profile

The output of the show ap config command displays the content of the profile settings for an individual AP or AP group. Use the commands displayed in the column to the left to configure these parameters.

rf dot11g-radio-profile

This command configures AP radio settings for the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. frequency bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation., including the Adaptive Radio Management (ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. ) profile and the high-throughput (802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.) radio profile.

rf arm-profile

This command configures the Adaptive Radio Management (ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. ) profile.

rf ht-radio-profile

This command configures high-throughput AP radio settings. High-throughput features use the IEEEInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. standard.

wlan ht-ssid-profile

This command configures a high-throughput SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. profile.

wlan virtual-ap

This command configures a virtual AP profile.

Command History

Release

Modification

ArubaOS 8.0.0.0

Command introduced.

Command Information

Platforms

License

Command Mode

All platforms

Base operating system.

Enable or Config mode on Mobility Master.

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