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ArubaOS User Guide

This User Guide describes the features supported in ArubaOS 8.x and provides instructions and examples to configure Mobility Master, managed devices, and access points. This guide is intended for system administrators responsible for configuring and maintaining wireless networks and assumes administrator knowledge in Layer 2 and Layer 3 networking technologies.

 

Throughout this document, branch controller and local controller are termed as a managed device.

What's New In ArubaOS 8.5.0.0

This section lists the new features, enhancements, or hardware platforms introduced in ArubaOS 8.5.0.0.

New Features

Table 1: New Features in ArubaOS 8.5.0.0

Enhancements

Description

Aruba sensor value

Starting from this release, an AP classifies and parses the content of advertisement and scan response frames and reports the BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption. telemetry to subscribers.

BLE functionality

Starting from this release, BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption. functionality is enabled on ArubaOS203H Series, 203R Series, 210 Series/220 Series (external USBUniversal Serial Bus. USB is a connection standard that offers a common interface for communication between the external devices and a computer. USB is the most common port used in the client devices. -based BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption. radio), 207 Series, 300 Series, 530 Series and 550 Series FIPSFederal Information Processing Standards. FIPS refers to a set of standards that describe document processing, encryption algorithms, and other information technology standards for use within non-military government agencies, and by government contractors and vendors who work with these agencies. APs.

BluConsole

Starting from this release, ArubaOS supports iOS BluConsole mobile application that allows a user to access the serial console of an AP over BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption..

Configuring AP image preload using the WebUI

Starting from this release, AP image preload can be configured using the WebUI.

Configuring CORP DNS Server

Starting from this release, Remote Access Points will use CORP DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. server to resolve DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. requests for EST enrollment.

Configuring ICMP based GRE Tunnels

Starting from this release, GREGeneric Routing Encapsulation. GRE is an IP encapsulation protocol that is used to transport packets over a network. tunnel will support ICMPInternet Control Message Protocol. ICMP is an error reporting protocol. It is used by network devices such as routers, to send error messages and operational information to the source IP address when network problems prevent delivery of IP packets. based health-check feature to monitor the status of WANWide Area Network. WAN is a telecommunications network or computer network that extends over a large geographical distance. reachability from remote uplink.

Configuring Mobility Master Layer 3 Redundancy

Mobility Master Layer-3 redundancy can be configured by navigating to Configuration > Redundancy >L3 Redundancy in the Mobility Master node hierarchy.

DHCP Option 82 sub-option 5

Starting from this release, DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  option 82 sub-option 5 can be used to relay non-routeable guest network users into corporate network to obtain IP addresses.

Enhanced visibility for application and controller health

ArubaOS now enables enhanced visibility of an application or controller health using new AMONAdvanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities. messages for NetInsight consumption.

Enhancements to 510 Series access points

The Aruba 510 Series campus APsCampus APs are used in private networks where APs connect over private links (LAN, WLAN, WAN or MPLS) and terminate directly on controllers. Campus APs are deployed as part of the indoor campus solution in enterprise office buildings, warehouses, hospitals, universities, and so on. now support the following features:

Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA)

ClientMatch

Cellular modem support

HotspotHotspot refers to a WLAN node that provides Internet connection and virtual private network (VPN) access from a given location. A business traveler, for example, with a laptop equipped for Wi-Fi can look up a local hotspot, contact it, and get connected through its network to reach the Internet.

Mesh

For complete technical details refer Aruba 510 Series Access Points Datasheet. For installation instructions, refer Aruba 510 Series Access Points Installation Guide.

Favendo sensors

Starting from this release, ArubaOS supports Favendo sensors to provide BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption.-based location services.

HanVit sensors

Starting from this release, ArubaOS supports HanVit sensors to provide BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption.-based location services.

IPv6 Support for Dynamic Authorization

Starting from this release, a managed device accepts RADIUSRemote Authentication Dial-In User Service. An Industry-standard network access protocol for remote authentication. It allows authentication, authorization, and accounting of remote users who want to access network resources.  CoAChange of Authorization. The RADIUS CoA is used in the AAA service framework to allow dynamic modification of the authenticated, authorized, and active subscriber sessions. , session timeout, and disconnect requests from IPv6 address based DAC, and identifies user sessions based on the user's IPv6 address.

Optimizing Cluster Load Balancing Thresholds

Starting from this release, when any new managed device, including the managed device that comes up after a failover, is added to an existing cluster, it is considered for load balancing and accordingly, APs and clients are moved to balance the load in the cluster.

Reporting Sensor Values

Starting from this release, some sensor values are reported immediately without waiting for the next reporting interval.

Support for new 4GFourth Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See LTE. modems on Remote APs and 7000 Series controllers

Starting from this release, Remote APs and 7000 Series controllers support the use of Huawei K5160, Huawei E8372, and ZTE MF823 USBUniversal Serial Bus. USB is a connection standard that offers a common interface for communication between the external devices and a computer. USB is the most common port used in the client devices. 4GFourth Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See LTE. modems to provide internet backhaul on a network.

Support for SoluM Gateway

Starting from this release, ArubaOS supports SoluM gatewayGateway is a network node that allows traffic to flow in and out of the network. to provide electronic shelf label services.

Support for WPA3 in 530 series and 550 series access points

Starting from this release, WPA3 is supported on 530 Series and 550 Series access points.

Spectrum analysis support on 530 series and 550 series access points

Starting from this release, spectrum analysis is supported on 530 Series and 550 Series access points.

Support for 256-bit encryption with WPA3 Enterprise in non-CNSA mode

Starting from this release, ArubaOS supports 256-bit encryption with WPA3 Enterprise in non-CNSA mode.

Support for EAP-GTC Authentication Option in VIA Connection Profile

Starting from this release, VIA connection profile supports EAP-GTCEAP – Generic Token Card. (non-tunneled). authentication option that enables the VIA client to establish IKEv2Internet Key Exchange version 2. IKEv2 uses the secure channel established in Phase 1 to negotiate Security Associations on behalf of services such as IPsec. IKEv2 uses pre-shared key and Digital Signature for authentication. See RFC 4306. tunnel with the managed device.

VRRP ID and Passphrase

Cluster allows users to set the starting value of VRRPVirtual Router Redundancy Protocol. VRRP is an election protocol that dynamically assigns responsibility for a virtual router to one of the VRRP routers on a LAN. ID and passphrase for a virtual IP in the cluster profile to avoid VRRPVirtual Router Redundancy Protocol. VRRP is an election protocol that dynamically assigns responsibility for a virtual router to one of the VRRP routers on a LAN. conflict. That is, Cluster VRRPVirtual Router Redundancy Protocol. VRRP is an election protocol that dynamically assigns responsibility for a virtual router to one of the VRRP routers on a LAN. members will be assigned consecutive VRRPVirtual Router Redundancy Protocol. VRRP is an election protocol that dynamically assigns responsibility for a virtual router to one of the VRRP routers on a LAN. IDs starting from the value configured.

WebUI Configuration Support for MultiZone

MultiZone can now be configured using the WebUI by navigating to Configuration > AP Groups > AP Group Name > MultiZone in the Managed Network node hierarchy.

WebUI Session ID

Starting from this release, WebUI session ID will contain a mix of uppercase, lowercase and numbers to prevent unauthorized intrusion into a pre-authenticated user session through brute-force attack.

WIDS Containment

Starting from this release, Air Monitor supports containment of rogue APs and prevents clients from associating with rogue APs.

Wi-Fi Uplink

Starting from this release, ArubaOS supports Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. uplink that provides connectivity of an Aruba AP to an external wireless network by using a third-party AP, such as a Mi-Fi device.

WLAN Ageout Refresh Direction

Starting from this release, the ageout refresh direction of WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. profile can be configured to use either bi-directional, receive-only or transmit-only data frames.

802.11ax capability on ClientMatch

Starting from this release, any 802.11ax capable STAs can be matched with 802.11ax capable radios dynamically resulting in better throughput and spectral efficiency.

Table 2: New Hardware Platforms in ArubaOS 8.5.0.0

 

Check with your local Aruba sales representative on new managed devices and access points availability in your country.

Hardware

Description

9000 Series controllers

The 9004 controller is a wireless LANLocal Area Network. A LAN is a network of connected devices within a distinct geographic area such as an office or a commercial establishment and share a common communications line or wireless link to a server. controller that connects, controls, and intelligently integrates wireless Access Points (APs) and Air Monitors (AMs) into a wired LANLocal Area Network. A LAN is a network of connected devices within a distinct geographic area such as an office or a commercial establishment and share a common communications line or wireless link to a server. system.

The 9004 controller has the following port configurations:

4 x 100/1000 BASE-T ports

MDI/MDX

USBUniversal Serial Bus. USB is a connection standard that offers a common interface for communication between the external devices and a computer. USB is the most common port used in the client devices. 3.0 port

RJ45Registered Jack 45. RJ45 is a physical connector for network cables. console port

Micro USBUniversal Serial Bus. USB is a connection standard that offers a common interface for communication between the external devices and a computer. USB is the most common port used in the client devices. console port

The 9004 controller has an integrated BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption. radio.

For technical specifications and installation instructions, refer 9004 controller Installation Guide.

NOTE: Aruba 9004 controllers only support auto negotiation for partner devices' speed and duplex.

530 Series campus access points

The 530 Series campus access points (AP-534, and AP-535) are high-performance, multi-radio wireless devices that can be deployed in either controller-based (ArubaOS) or controllerless (Aruba Instant) network environments. These APs deliver high performance concurrent 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz. 802.11ax Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. (Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. 6) functionality with 4x4 MIMOMultiple Input Multiple Output. An antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both source (transmitter) and destination (receiver). The antennas at each end of the communications circuit are combined to minimize errors and optimize data speed. radios, while also supporting legacy 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps., 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps., 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network., 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz., and 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band. wireless services.

Wired EthernetEthernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. ports located on the back of these APs are used to connect the device to the wired networking infrastructure (wired speeds up to 5 GbpsGigabits per second. are supported by both ports) and to provide POE power (802.3at802.3at is an IEEE standard for PoE version that supplies up to 25.5W of DC power. See PoE+. class 4 or 802.3bt class 5) to the device. These APs also support 802.11w standard in tunnel mode with WPA3 security mode.

In addition to both the Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. radios, AP-530 Series Campus APsCampus APs are used in private networks where APs connect over private links (LAN, WLAN, WAN or MPLS) and terminate directly on controllers. Campus APs are deployed as part of the indoor campus solution in enterprise office buildings, warehouses, hospitals, universities, and so on. are equipped with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption.) radio that provide the following capabilities:

Location beacon applications

IoTInternet of Things. IoT refers to the internetworking of devices that are embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and network connectivity features allowing data exchange over the Internet. gatewayGateway is a network node that allows traffic to flow in and out of the network. applications

For technical specifications and installation instructions, refer Aruba 530 Series Campus Access Points Installation Guide.

550 Series campus access points

The Aruba 550 Series campus access points (AP-555) are high-performance, multi-radio wireless devices that can be deployed in either controller-based (ArubaOS) or controllerless (Aruba Instant) network environments. These APs deliver high-performance concurrent 2.4 GHzGigahertz. 802.11ax Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. (Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. 6) functionality with 4x4 MIMOMultiple Input Multiple Output. An antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both source (transmitter) and destination (receiver). The antennas at each end of the communications circuit are combined to minimize errors and optimize data speed. radio and 5 GHzGigahertz. 802.11ax Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. (Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. 6) functionality with 8x8 MIMOMultiple Input Multiple Output. An antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both source (transmitter) and destination (receiver). The antennas at each end of the communications circuit are combined to minimize errors and optimize data speed. radio, while also supporting legacy 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps., 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps., 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network., 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz., and 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band. wireless services. These APs also support 802.11w standard in tunnel mode with WPA3 security mode.

Wired EthernetEthernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. ports located on the back of these APs are used to connect the device to the wired networking infrastructure (wired speeds up to 5 GbpsGigabits per second. are supported by both ports) and to provide POE power (802.3at802.3at is an IEEE standard for PoE version that supplies up to 25.5W of DC power. See PoE+. class 4 or 802.3bt class 5) to the device.

In addition to both the Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. radios, AP-550 Series Campus APsCampus APs are used in private networks where APs connect over private links (LAN, WLAN, WAN or MPLS) and terminate directly on controllers. Campus APs are deployed as part of the indoor campus solution in enterprise office buildings, warehouses, hospitals, universities, and so on. are equipped with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLEBluetooth Low Energy. The BLE functionality is offered by Bluetooth® to enable devices to run for long durations with low power consumption.) radio that provide the following capabilities:

Location beacon applications

IoTInternet of Things. IoT refers to the internetworking of devices that are embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and network connectivity features allowing data exchange over the Internet. gatewayGateway is a network node that allows traffic to flow in and out of the network. applications

For technical specifications and installation instructions, refer 550 Series Campus Access Points Installation Guide.

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