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AP Provisioning

AP provisioning settings allow you to define a set of additional provisioning information for an AP, such as USBUniversal Serial Bus. USB is a connection standard that offers a common interface for communication between the external devices and a computer. USB is the most common port used in the client devices. modem settings, PPPoEPoint-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet. PPPoE is a method of connecting to the Internet, typically used with DSL services, where the client connects to the DSL modem. values, or configuration settings to provision an AP as a Remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link..

Ensure that any provisioning changes you make are complete and accurate before you save those settings. If an AP is configured incorrectly with erroneous parameters, that AP may be lost. If you want to provision APs with more than one interface, you can also configure the USBUniversal Serial Bus. USB is a connection standard that offers a common interface for communication between the external devices and a computer. USB is the most common port used in the client devices. settings and interface priority levels using an AP provisioning profile.

The following procedure describes how to provision APs.

1. Navigate to the Configuration > Access Points window.

2. Select the AP to which you want to add new provisioning settings, then click Provision. The AP provisioning settings divided into two groups. By default, the ArubaOS WebUI displays configuration settings described in Table 1.

Table 1: AP Provisioning Profile Parameters

Parameter

Description

Name

Name assigned to an AP

An AP requires a reboot before a new AP name takes effect. Therefore, wait until there is little or no client traffic passing through the AP before renaming it.

AP Group

AP group to which the AP is assigned.

Remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link.

Select this check box to provision the APs as Remote APsRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link.. If you are provisioning Remote APsRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link., you must also add the remote APsRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link. to the Remote APRemote APs extend corporate network to the users working from home or at temporary work sites. Remote APs are deplyed at branch office sites and are connected to the central network on a WAN link. whitelist. For details, see Remote Access Points.

Controller Discovery

Select Use AP discovery protocol (ADP) if you want to provide the AP with its managed device IP address, or select Static to manually define the managed device IP for that AP. If you select the Static option, you are prompted to enter the managed device's DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. name or IP address.

ADPAruba Discovery Protocol. ADP is an Aruba proprietary Layer 2 protocol. It is used by the APs to obtain the IP address of the TFTP server from which it downloads the AP boot image. is enabled by default on all Aruba APs and managed devices. With ADPAruba Discovery Protocol. ADP is an Aruba proprietary Layer 2 protocol. It is used by the APs to obtain the IP address of the TFTP server from which it downloads the AP boot image., APs send out periodic multicast and broadcast queries to locate the Mobility Master. ADPAruba Discovery Protocol. ADP is an Aruba proprietary Layer 2 protocol. It is used by the APs to obtain the IP address of the TFTP server from which it downloads the AP boot image. requires that all APs and managed devices are connected to the same Layer-2 network. If the devices are on different networks, you must use a Layer-3 compatible discovery mechanism, such as DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element., DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network. , or IGMPInternet Group Management Protocol. Communications protocol used by hosts and adjacent routers on IP networks to establish multicast group memberships. forwarding.

IP

Select DHCP if you have configured a DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  server to provide the AP with the AP IP address, or select Static to manually define the AP IP address.

If you select the Static option, you are prompted to enter the following information for the selected AP:

IPv4 address, netmaskNetmask is a 32-bit mask used for segregating IP address into subnets. Netmask defines the class and range of IP addresses., internet gatewayGateway is a network node that allows traffic to flow in and out of the network. used by the AP, and DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. server.

IPv6 address, netmaskNetmask is a 32-bit mask used for segregating IP address into subnets. Netmask defines the class and range of IP addresses., internet gatewayGateway is a network node that allows traffic to flow in and out of the network. used by the AP, and DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. server.

TFTPTrivial File Transfer Protocol. The TFTP is a software utility for transferring files from or to a remote host. Server (Select Show advanced options)

IPv4 / IPv6 address of the TFTPTrivial File Transfer Protocol. The TFTP is a software utility for transferring files from or to a remote host. server from which the AP can download its boot image.

Coverage Area

This setting defines the type of installation (indoor or outdoor). The default option indicates that the installation mode is determined by the AP model type.

Single Chain Mode

If this option is enabled for an 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.-capable radio, the radio will operate in single-chain mode, and will transmit and receive data using only legacy rates and single-stream HTHigh Throughput. IEEE 802.11n is an HT WLAN standard that aims to achieve physical data rates of close to 600 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. rates up to MCSModulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. 7. This parameter is disabled by default.

PEAPProtected Extensible Authentication Protocol. PEAP is a type of EAP communication that addresses security issues associated with clear text EAP transmissions by creating a secure channel encrypted and protected by TLS. username

Username of AP so that AP can authenticate to 802.1X802.1X is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control designed to enhance 802.11 WLAN security. 802.1X provides an authentication framework that allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority. using PEAPProtected Extensible Authentication Protocol. PEAP is a type of EAP communication that addresses security issues associated with clear text EAP transmissions by creating a secure channel encrypted and protected by TLS..

PEAPProtected Extensible Authentication Protocol. PEAP is a type of EAP communication that addresses security issues associated with clear text EAP transmissions by creating a secure channel encrypted and protected by TLS. password

Password of AP so that AP can authenticate to 802.1X802.1X is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control designed to enhance 802.11 WLAN security. 802.1X provides an authentication framework that allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority. using PEAPProtected Extensible Authentication Protocol. PEAP is a type of EAP communication that addresses security issues associated with clear text EAP transmissions by creating a secure channel encrypted and protected by TLS..

EAP-TLSEAP–Transport Layer Security. EAP-TLS is a certificate-based authentication method supporting mutual authentication, integrity-protected ciphersuite negotiation and key exchange between two endpoints. See RFC 5216.

Enable AP to 802.1x using EAP-TLSEAP–Transport Layer Security. EAP-TLS is a certificate-based authentication method supporting mutual authentication, integrity-protected ciphersuite negotiation and key exchange between two endpoints. See RFC 5216..

EAP-TLS use factory certificate

Enable AP to use factory certificates when doing 802.1x EAP-TLSEAP–Transport Layer Security. EAP-TLS is a certificate-based authentication method supporting mutual authentication, integrity-protected ciphersuite negotiation and key exchange between two endpoints. See RFC 5216..

 

It is recommended not to connect both the EthernetEthernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. ports of the APs to the uplink switch, because the APs act as DHCPDynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  servers to wired clients when LACPLink Aggregation Control Protocol. LACP is used for the collective handling of multiple physical ports that can be seen as a single channel for network traffic purposes. is not configured on the uplink switch. This occurs when APs with more than one EthernetEthernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. interface are not under a managed device.

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