ClientMatch Overview

ClientMatch continually monitors the RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood for each client to provide ongoing client bandsteering and load balancing, and enhanced AP reassignment for roaming mobile clients.

 

Legacy 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps./b/g devices do not support ClientMatch. When you enable ClientMatch on 802.11n 802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.-capable devices, ClientMatch overrides any settings configured for the legacy bandsteering or load balancing features. 802.11ac 802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band.-capable devices do not support the legacy bandsteering, station hand off or load balancing settings, so these APs must be managed on using ClientMatch.

The managed device aggregates information it receives from all APs using ClientMatch, and maintains information for all associated clients in a database. The managed device shares this database with the APs (for their associated clients), and the APs use the information to compute the client-based RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood and determine which APs should be considered candidate APs for each client. When the managed device receives a client steer request from an AP, the managed device identifies the optimal AP candidate and manages the client’s relocation to the desired radio. This is an improvement from previous releases, where ARM Adaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. was managed exclusively by APs, without the larger perspective of the client RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood.

In Mobility Master / managed device deployments where APs are connected to a managed device that is associated to Mobility Master, the AP sends RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood information to the managed device, which then forwards that information to the Mobility Master. The Mobility Master receives probe reports from all managed devices and generates a VBR Virtual Beacon Report. VBR displays a report with the MAC address details and RSSI information of an AP. for each client. These VBRs are sent from the Mobility Master to the managed device, and then to the AP to which the client is associated. APs associated to a stand-alone controller receive and collect information about clients in their neighborhood, and periodically send this information to the controller, which in turn generates VBRs and sends them directly back to the APs.

The following client or AP mismatch conditions are managed by ClientMatch:

Load Balancing: ClientMatch balances clients across APs on different channels, based upon the client load on the APs and the SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. levels that the client detects from an underused AP. If an AP radio can support additional clients, the AP will participate in ClientMatch load balancing, and clients can be directed to that AP radio, subject to predefined SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. thresholds.

Sticky Clients: ClientMatch also helps mobile clients that tend to stay associated to an AP despite low signal levels. APs using ClientMatch continually monitor the client RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. as it roams between APs, and moves the client to an AP when a better radio match is found. This prevents mobile clients from remaining associated to APs with a less than ideal RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values., which can cause poor connectivity and reduce performance for other clients associated with that AP.

Band Steering/Band Balancing: APs using the ClientMatch feature monitor the RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. for clients that advertise dual-band capability. If a client is currently associated to a 2.4 GHz Gigahertz. radio, and the AP detects that the client has a good RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. from the 5 GHz Gigahertz. radio, the managed device attempts to steer the client to the 5 GHz Gigahertz. radio, as long as the 5 GHz Gigahertz. RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. is not significantly worse than the 2.4 GHz Gigahertz. RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values., and the AP retains a suitable distribution of clients on each of its radios.

HE Steering: 802.11ax clients are best compatible with 802.11ax capable radios, resulting in better throughput and spectral efficiency. When an 802.11ax client is associated with a lower radio, ClientMatch pushes the client to the best compatible 802.11ax radio for advanced capabilities. Though STA is in good health, and is 802.11ax capable, it still sometimes connects to lower radios. ClientMatch finds a potential 802.11ax radio on the same band Band refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. and the client moves to the new 802.11ax radio.

This section describes the following topics:

Incremental Rules-Based ClientMatch Updates

The ClientMatch rules that manage client associations are based primarily upon the client RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. environment and apply uniformly to all client types, regardless of device type or operating system. ArubaOS 8.0.0.0 supports incremental updates to ClientMatch rules to support network devices running newer operating systems that may be incompatible with the existing ClientMatch client association rules. This feature allows the managed device to use a newer set of ClientMatch rules without updating the entire operating system, reducing network downtime.

BSS Transition Management Support

The BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. Transition Management Support feature allows ClientMatch to steer devices using 802.11v 802.11v is an IEEE standard that allows client devices to exchange information about the network topology and RF environment. This information is used for assigning best available radio resources for the client devices to provide seamless connectivity. BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. transition management standards for continuous wireless connectivity. This feature provides a seamless standards-compatible method of device steering in wireless networks, as 802.11v 802.11v is an IEEE standard that allows client devices to exchange information about the network topology and RF environment. This information is used for assigning best available radio resources for the client devices to provide seamless connectivity. BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. transition management support has become increasingly common in wireless devices.

When ClientMatch attempts to steer the client to a more optimal AP, it sends out an 802.11v 802.11v is an IEEE standard that allows client devices to exchange information about the network topology and RF environment. This information is used for assigning best available radio resources for the client devices to provide seamless connectivity. BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. transition management request to the 11v capable station and waits for a response.

1. ClientMatch begins a timeout session for the BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. transition management response or new association request to the desired AP.

2. If the request is rejected or the timeout session expires, ClientMatch is notified of the failed attempt and reinitiates the steer using the 802.11v 802.11v is an IEEE standard that allows client devices to exchange information about the network topology and RF environment. This information is used for assigning best available radio resources for the client devices to provide seamless connectivity. BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. transition management request.

If the client steer fails the maximum number of timeout attempts (default: 5), ClientMatch marks the client as 11v unsupported and falls back to using deauths to steer.

If the client steer fails due to request rejection, ClientMatch does not mark the client as 11v unsupported and continues to attempt to steer using the 802.11v 802.11v is an IEEE standard that allows client devices to exchange information about the network topology and RF environment. This information is used for assigning best available radio resources for the client devices to provide seamless connectivity. BSS Basic Service Set. A BSS is a set of interconnected stations that can communicate with each other. BSS can be an independent BSS or infrastructure BSS. An independent BSS is an ad hoc network that does not include APs, whereas the infrastructure BSS consists of an AP and all its associated clients. transition management request.

Multi-Media Sync-Up

ClientMatch offers a tighter integration with multiple media-aware ALGs to provide better call quality for programs like Skype for Business (Skype4b) and Facetime. With ClientMatch’s ability to understand various media protocols, clients are not steered to different APs in the middle of an active media session.

When a client participates in a call, the managed device learns about the media session and sends this information to the AP to which the client is currently associated, as part of the variable bitrate update. When the AP learns that the client is in a call, it will not attempt to steer the client to another AP until the managed device indicates that the call has ended, allowing calls to run more smoothly without any disruptions to the ongoing media flow.

Multi-User MIMO Steering

Multi-user MIMO Multiple Input Multiple Output. An antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both source (transmitter) and destination (receiver). The antennas at each end of the communications circuit are combined to minimize errors and optimize data speed. , or MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. Steering, groups multi-user-capable (MU-capable) clients to maximize the likelihood of MIMO Multiple Input Multiple Output. An antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both source (transmitter) and destination (receiver). The antennas at each end of the communications circuit are combined to minimize errors and optimize data speed. transmissions, which increases downstream throughput performance in 802.11ac 802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band. Wave 2 (gen 2) APs. MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. runs on MU-capable clients with traffic flows and PHY channels compatible for multi-user transmissions. ClientMatch steers and aligns MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable clients with MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable radios using SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. values. Multiple MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable clients can be grouped together on a MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable radio.

Successful MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. transmissions depend on the following:

Traffic streams that can be multiplexed for MIMO Multiple Input Multiple Output. An antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both source (transmitter) and destination (receiver). The antennas at each end of the communications circuit are combined to minimize errors and optimize data speed. transmissions. This is dependent on packet length and traffic flow rates (packet arrival rates) from APs to the devices.

MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable clients associated to the same radio, whose PHY channel matrices are compatible for simultaneous multi-user transmissions

In an 802.11ac 802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band. AP deployment, clients indicate VHT Very High Throughput. IEEE 802.11ac is an emerging VHT WLAN standard that could achieve physical data rates of close to 7 Gbps for the 5 GHz band. capabilities for probe requests and association requests, including MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. support. The APs and managed devices use this information to determine whether the client is MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable.

After the MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable clients are located, they are steered to an appropriate MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. -capable radio. MU-MIMO Multi-User Multiple-Input Multiple-Output. MU-MIMO is a set of multiple-input and multiple-output technologies for wireless communication, in which users or wireless terminals with one or more antennas communicate with each other. Steering ensures that steers are compatible with existing trigger thresholds, such as sticky clients and load-balancing. The multi-user SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. threshold of the target radio must be greater than the sticky client SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. threshold, and radios that exceed the client threshold are avoided to prevent the need for load-balancing.

Removing VBR Dependency on Probe Requests

ClientMatch has shifted its dependency on probe requests to the AM Air Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. data feeds for virtual beacon report data. Instead of relying solely on client background scans during probe requests, which can cause limitations due to low scanning frequency, ClientMatch uses AM Air Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. data feeds to gain more continuous, comprehensive client RSSI Received Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. feeds. Along with probe requests, Air Monitor data feeds collect client information during AP scanning using the following frames:

Block ACK

Management frames

NULL data frames

Data frames with rates no higher than 36Mbps

Control frames

ClientInsight

ClientInsight is a new feature that integrates ClientMatch with data analytics and insights from NetInsight. ClientInsight is designed to support the next generation data-driven wireless network automation.

Aruba NetInsight delivers network assurance by arming IT organizations with machine learning based analytics for proactively running today's fast paced networks. With automated insights and prescriptive recommendations, businesses can continuously adapt and improve the quality of experience for users and the Internet of Things (IoT Internet of Things. IoT refers to the internetworking of devices that are embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and network connectivity features allowing data exchange over the Internet.).

ClientInsight allows for NetInsight to automatically create customized rules based on observations on ClientMatch outcomes steered during deployments. You can configure this feature using the NetInsight API Application Programming Interface. Refers to a set of functions, procedures, protocols, and tools that enable users to build application software.. For further details about ClientInsight, refer to the Aruba NetInsight User Guide.

Datapath Health Monitoring with AMON

ArubaOS now enables enhanced visibility of an application or controller health using datapath and session information. The data and counters maintained by datapath can be helpful in assessing datapath CPU Central Processing Unit. A CPU is an electronic circuitry in a computer for processing instructions. utilization and controller health.

NetInsight currently uses the show datapath command, and AMON_HWMON_SYS_INFO_MESSAGE(71) and AMON_AP_SYSTEM_STATS(18) AMON messages to indicate controller CPU Central Processing Unit. A CPU is an electronic circuitry in a computer for processing instructions. and AP CPU Central Processing Unit. A CPU is an electronic circuitry in a computer for processing instructions. utilization respectively. Starting from ArubaOS 8.5.0.0, the following list of new AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities. messages are introduced to determine and assess the datapath CPU Central Processing Unit. A CPU is an electronic circuitry in a computer for processing instructions. utilization and health.

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_RES_UTIL_MESSAGE

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_CPU Central Processing Unit. A CPU is an electronic circuitry in a computer for processing instructions._UTIL_STATS_MESSAGE

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_DEBUG_DMA_MESSAGE

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_BWM_MESSAGE

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_MAINT_CNTR_MESSAGE

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_CNTR_DESC_MESSAGE

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_CNTR_VAL_MESSAGE

 

AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_CNTR_DESC_MESSAGE and AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities._SOS_CNTR_VAL_MESSAGE messages are in Protobuf format and not the traditional AMON Advanced Monitoring. AMON is used in Aruba WLAN deployments for improved network management, monitoring and diagnostic capabilities. message format.