Overview of Basic Functions of an AP

APs use AI-powered RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. optimization, rich user and application intelligence, and smart management options to improve user experiences, enhance Quality of Service (QoS Quality of Service. It refers to the capability of a network to provide better service and performance to a specific network traffic over various technologies.), and support digital workplace initiatives. This section describes the basic functionalities of an AP. Use the Mobility Master WebUI and command-line interface to configure APs.

Table 1: AP Configuration Function Overview

Features and Function

Description

WLANs

A WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. permits wireless clients to connect to the network. An AP broadcasts the SSID Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. (which corresponds to a WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. configured on the Mobility Master to wireless clients. APs support multiple SSIDs Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network.. WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. configuration includes the authentication method and the authentication servers by which wireless users are validated for access.

The WebUI includes a WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. Wizard that provides easy-to-follow steps to configure a new WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection..

NOTE: All new WLANs Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. are associated with the ap-group named “default”.

AP operation

An AP can function as an AP that serves clients, as an AM Air Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. performing network and RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. monitoring, or as a hybrid AP that serves both clients and performs spectrum analysis a single radio channel. You can also specify the regulatory domain (the country) which determines the 802.11 802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. transmission spectrum in which the AP will operate. Within the regulated transmission spectrum, you can configure 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps., 802.11b 802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g, or 802.11n 802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. (high-throughput) radio settings.

NOTE: The 802.11n 802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. features, such as high-throughput and 40 MHz Megahertz configuration settings, are supported on APs that are 802.11n 802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. standard compliant.

Quality of Service (QoS)

Configure Voice over IP call admission control options and bandwidth allocation for 5 GHz Gigahertz. (802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps.) or 2.4 GHz Gigahertz. (802.11b 802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps./g) frequency bands Band refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. of traffic.

RF Management

Configure settings for balancing wireless traffic across APs, detect holes in radio coverage, or other metrics that can indicate interference and potential problems on the wireless network.

ARM Adaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. is an RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. spectrum management technology that allows each AP to determine the best 802.11 802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. channel and transmit power settings. ARM Adaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. provides several configurable settings.

Intrusion Detection System

Configure settings to detect and disable rogue APs, adhoc networks, and unauthorized devices, and prevent attacks on the network. You can also configure signatures to detect and prevent intrusions and attacks.

Mesh

Configure Aruba APs as mesh nodes to bridge multiple Ethernet Ethernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. LANs or extend wireless coverage. A mesh node is either

  • mesh portal: an AP that uses its wired interface to reach the managed device
  • mesh point: an AP that establishes a path to the managed device via the mesh portal
  • mesh auto: an AP that automatically detects the mesh role and configures mesh portal or mesh point.

AP Boot Time

An AP can take up to a minute to boot up currently. The fast boot feature enables the APs to boot up within less time. Faster boot time results in an AP boot time from boot to shell prompt within 1 minute.

NOTE: AP fast boot is supported on AP-534, AP-535, and AP-555 access points only.