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Cluster Deployment Scenarios

Clusters can be deployed in four different scenarios. The following section describes the guidelines for these different cluster deployment scenarios.

Scenario 1: Cluster with Virtual IP Setup

In this scenario, an AP performs a cluster failover to the S-AAC if the A-AAC (LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. ) is down. The APs perform internal rebootstrap if both A-AAC and S-AAC are down at the same time. If the AP reboots on any node including the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. , the AP remembers the nodelist and tries all the entries in the nodelist. The AP performs a legacy rebootstrap only when it cannot reach any of the nodes.

Following are the guidelines to ensure a successful deployment of the cluster in a Virtual IP :

Scenario 2: Cluster with Multiple Master via DNS resolution

In this scenario, an AP will perform a cluster failover to the S-AAC if the A-AAC (LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. ) is down. The AP internally rebootstraps if both A-AAC and S-AAC are down at the same time and the AP tries to contact another node in the cluster till it is unable to reach the entire nodelist in the cluster. If the AP reboots on any node including the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. , the AP remembers the nodelist and tries all the entries in the nodelist. The AP performs a legacy rebootstrap only when it cannot reach any of the nodes.

Following are the guidelines to ensure for the successful deployment of the cluster in a multiple master via DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. resolution setup:

 

In a large deployment, Aruba recommends this configuration to avoid large failure domain.

Scenario 3: Cluster with Virtual IP via DNS Resolution Across Data Centers

In this scenario, when an A-AAC is down, the AP fails over to an S-AAC. An AP internally rebootstraps if both A-AAC and S-AAC are down at the same time and the AP tries to contact another node in Cluster1 till all the nodes are exhausted in the Cluster1 nodelist. If the AP is not able to reach Cluster1, it fails over to the backup LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. .

If LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. preemption is enabled, APs preempt to Cluster1 when the primary LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. node is up on Cluster1. The APs remain on Cluster2 if the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. preemption is disabled even though the Cluster1 is up.

If the AP reboots on any node including the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. , the AP remembers the nodelist and tries all the entries in the nodelist. The AP performs a legacy rebootstrap only when it cannot reach any of the nodes.

Following are the guidelines to ensure a successful deployment of the cluster with Virtual IP via DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. resolution across data centers:

In a large deployment, Aruba recommends this configuration to avoid large failure domain.

Scenario 4: Cluster with Multiple Master via DNS Resolution Across Data Centers

In this scenario, when an A-AAC is down, the AP fails over to an S-AAC. An AP internally rebootstraps if both A-AAC and S-AAC are down at the same time and the AP tries to contact another node in Cluster1 till all nodes in the nodelist of Cluster1 are exhausted. If the AP is unable to reach Cluster1, it fails over to the backup LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. .

APs terminate on the node of Cluster2, which is configured as a backup-LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. using legacy failover.

If LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. preemption is enabled, APs will preempt to Cluster1 when the primary LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. node is up on Cluster1. APs remain on Cluster2 if the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. preemption is disabled even though the Cluster1 is up.

If the AP reboots on any node including the LMSLocal Management Switch. In multi-controller networks, each controller acts as an LMS and terminates user traffic from the APs, processes, and forwards the traffic to the wired network. , the AP remembers the nodelist and tries all the entries in the nodelist. The AP will perform a legacy rebootstrap only when it cannot reach any of the nodes.

Following are the guidelines to ensure a successful deployment of the cluster with multiple master via DNSDomain Name System. A DNS server functions as a phone book for the intranet and Internet users. It converts human-readable computer host names into IP addresses and IP addresses into host names. It stores several records for a domain name such as an address 'A' record, name server (NS), and mail exchanger (MX) records. The Address 'A' record is the most important record that is stored in a DNS server, because it provides the required IP address for a network peripheral or element. resolution across data centers:

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