Overview of AP Boot Sequence

This section describes the boot sequence for mesh APs in detail. Depending on its configured role, the AP performs a slightly different boot sequence.

Booting the Mesh Portal

When the mesh portal boots, it recognizes that one radio is configured to operate as a mesh portal. It then obtains an IP address from a DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  server on its Ethernet Ethernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. interface, discovers the Mobility Master on that interface, registers the mesh radio with the managed device, and obtains regulatory domain and mesh radio profiles for each mesh point interface. A mesh virtual AP is created on the mesh portal radio interface, the regulatory domain and radio profiles are used to bring up the radio on the correct channel, and the provisioned mesh cluster profile is used to set up the mesh virtual AP with the correct announcements on beacons and probe responses. On the non-mesh radio provisioned for access mode, that radio is a thin AP and everything on that interface works as a thin AP radio interface.

If the 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. radio profile assigned to the mesh radio is enabled, the radio supports both mesh backhaul and client access Virtual APs. If the mesh radio is to be used exclusively for mesh backhaul traffic, associate that radio to a dedicated 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. radio profile with the radio disabled so the mesh radios carry backhaul traffic only.

Booting the Mesh Point

When the mesh point boots, it scans for neighboring mesh nodes to establish a link to the mesh portal. All of the mesh nodes that establish the link are in the same mesh cluster. After the link is up, the mesh point uses the DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A network protocol that enables a server to automatically assign an IP address to an IP-enabled device from a defined range of numbers configured for a given network.  to obtain an IP address and uses the same Mobility Master as their parent. The remaining boot sequence, if applicable, is similar to that of a thin AP. Remember, the priority of the mesh point is establishing a link with neighboring mesh nodes, not establishing a control link to a managed device.

In a single hop environment, the mesh point establishes a direct link with the mesh portal.

Air Monitoring and Mesh

Each mesh node has an AM Air Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. process that registers the BSSID Basic Service Set Identifier. The BSSID identifies a particular BSS within an area. In infrastructure BSS networks, the BSSID is the MAC address of the AP. In independent BSS or ad hoc networks, the BSSID is generated randomly. and the MAC Media Access Control. A MAC address is a unique identifier assigned to network interfaces for communications on a network. address of the mesh node to distinguish it from a thin AP. This allows the WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. management system on the managed node and AMs deployed in your network to distinguish between APs, wireless clients, and mesh nodes. The WMS tables also identify the mesh nodes.

For all thin APs and mesh nodes, the AM Air Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. identifies a mesh node from other packets monitored on the air, and the AM Air Monitor. AM is a mode of operation supported on wireless APs. When an AP operates in the Air Monitor mode, it enhances the wireless networks by collecting statistics, monitoring traffic, detecting intrusions, enforcing security policies, balancing wireless traffic load, self-healing coverage gaps, and more. However, clients cannot connect to APs operating in the AM mode. does not trigger wireless-bridging events for packets transmitted between mesh nodes.