Overview of Mesh Profiles

Mesh profiles help define and bring-up the mesh network. The following sections describe the mesh cluster, mesh radio, and mesh recovery profiles in more detail.

The complete mesh profile consists of a mesh radio profile, RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. management (802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. and 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network.) radio profiles, a high-throughput SSID Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. profile (if your deployment includes 802.11n 802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.-capable APs), a mesh cluster profile, and a read-only recovery profile. The recovery profile is dynamically generated by the Mobility Master; you do not explicitly configure the recovery profile.

Aruba provides a default version of the mesh radio, RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. management, high-throughput SSID Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. and cluster profiles with default values for most parameters. You can use the default version of a profile or create a new instance of a profile which you can then edit as you need. You can change the values of any parameter in a profile. You have the flexibility of applying the default versions of profiles in addition to customizing profiles that are necessary for the AP or AP group to function.

If you assign a profile to an individual AP, the values in the profile override the profile assigned to the AP group to which the AP belongs. The exception is the mesh cluster profile: you can apply multiple mesh cluster profiles to individual APs, as well as to AP groups.

The various types of mesh profiles are described below:

About Mesh Cluster Profiles

Mesh clusters are grouped and defined by a mesh cluster profile, which provides the framework of the mesh network. Similar to virtual AP profiles, the mesh cluster profile contains the MSSID Mesh Service Set Identifier. MSSID is the SSID used by the client to access a wireless mesh network., authentication methods, security credentials, and cluster priority required for mesh nodes to associate with their neighbors and join the cluster. Associated mesh nodes store this information in flash memory. Although most mesh deployments require only a single mesh cluster profile, you can configure and apply multiple mesh cluster profiles to an AP group or an individual AP. If you have multiple cluster profiles, the mesh portal uses the profile with the highest priority to bring up the mesh network. Mesh points, in contrast, go through the list of mesh cluster profiles in order of priority to decide which profile to use to associate themselves with the network. The mesh cluster priority determines the order by which the mesh cluster profiles are used. This allows you, rather than the link metric algorithm, to explicitly segment the network by defining multiple cluster profiles.

Since the mesh cluster profile provides the framework of the mesh network, you must define and configure the mesh cluster profile before configuring an AP to operate as a mesh node. You can use either the default cluster profile or create your own. If you find it necessary to define more than one mesh cluster profile, you must assign priorities to each profile to allow the Mesh AP group to identify the primary and backup mesh cluster profiles. The primary mesh cluster profile and each backup mesh cluster profile must be configured to use the same RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. channel. The APs may not provision correctly if they are assigned to a backup mesh cluster profile with a different RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. channel than the primary mesh cluster profile.

If the mesh cluster profile is unavailable, the mesh node can revert to the recovery profile to bring-up the mesh network until the cluster profile is available. You can also exclude one or more mesh cluster profiles from an individual access point, this prevents a mesh cluster profile defined at the AP group level from being applied to a specific AP.

Do not delete or modify mesh cluster profiles once you use them to provision mesh nodes. You can recover the mesh point if the original cluster profile is still available. It is recommended to create a new mesh cluster profile if needed. If you modify any mesh cluster setting, you must reprovision your AP for the changes to take effect (this also causes the AP to automatically reboot).

If you configure multiple cluster profiles with different cluster priorities, you manually override the link metric algorithm because the priority takes precedence over the path cost. In this scenario, the mesh portal uses the profile with the highest priority to bring-up the mesh network. The mesh portal stores and advertises that one profile to neighboring mesh nodes to build the mesh network. This profile is known as the primary cluster profile. Mesh points, in contrast, go through the list of configured mesh cluster profiles in order of priority to find the profile being advertised by the mesh portal. Once the primary profile has been identified, the other profiles are considered backup cluster profiles. Use this deployment if you want to enforce a particular mesh topology rather than allowing the link metric algorithm to determine the topology.

For this scenario, do the following:

If a mesh link breaks or the primary cluster profile is unavailable, mesh nodes use the highest priority backup cluster profile to re-establish the uplink or check for parents in the backup profiles. If these profiles are unavailable, the mesh node can revert to the recovery profile to bring up the mesh network until a cluster profile is available.

About Mesh Radio Profiles

The mesh radio profile allows you to specify the set of rates used to transmit data on the mesh link. This profile also allows you to define a reselection-mode setting to optimize the operation of the link metric algorithm. The reselection mode specifies the method a mesh node uses to find a better uplink to create a path to the mesh portal. Only neighbors on the same channel in the same mesh cluster are considered.

The mesh radio profile includes the following reselection mode options:

  • reselect- anytime: mesh points using the reselect-anytime reselection mode perform a single topology readjustment scan within 9 minutes of startup and 4 minutes after a link is formed. If no better parent is found, the mesh point returns to its original parent. This initial scan evaluates more distant mesh points before closer mesh points, and incurs a dropout of 5–8 seconds for each mesh point. After the initial startup scan is completed, connected mesh nodes evaluate mesh links every 30 seconds. If a mesh node finds a better uplink, the mesh node connects to the new parent to create an improved path to the mesh portal.
  • reselect-never: connected mesh nodes do not evaluate other mesh links to create an improved path to the mesh portal.
  • startup-subthreshold: mesh points using the startup-subthreshold reselection mode perform a single topology readjustment scan within 9 minutes of startup and 4 minutes after a link is formed. If no better parent is found, the mesh point returns to its original parent. This initial startup scan evaluates more distant mesh points before closer mesh points, and incurs a dropout of 5–8 seconds for each mesh point. After that time, each mesh node evaluates alternative links if the existing uplink falls below the configured threshold level (the link becomes a sub-threshold link). It is recommended to use this default startup-subthreshold value.
  • subthreshold-only: connected mesh nodes evaluate alternative links only if the existing uplink becomes a sub-threshold link.

If a mesh point using the startup-subthreshold or subthreshold-only mode reselects a more distant parent because its original, closer parent falls below the acceptable threshold, then as long as that mesh point is connected to that more distant parent, it seeks to reselect a parent at the earlier, shorter distance (or less) with good link quality. For example, if a mesh point disconnects from a mesh parent 2 hops away and subsequently reconnects to a mesh parent 3 hops away, then the mesh point continues to seek a connection to a mesh parent with both an acceptable link quality and a distance of two hops or less, even if the more distant parent also has an acceptable link quality.

About RF Management (802.11a and 802.11g) Profiles

The two 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. and 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. management profiles for an AP configure its 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. (5 GHz Gigahertz.) and 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. (2.4 GHz Gigahertz.) radio settings. Use these profile settings to determine the channel, beacon period, transmit power, and ARM Adaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. profile for a mesh AP’s 5 GHz Gigahertz. and 2.4 GHz Gigahertz. frequency bands Band refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. You can either use the default version of each profile, or create a new 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. profile which you can then configure as necessary. Each RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. management profile also has a radio-enable parameter that allows you to enable or disable the AP’s ability to simultaneously carry WLAN Wireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. client traffic and mesh-backhaul traffic on that radio. This value is enabled by default.

Mesh nodes operating in different cluster profiles can share the same radio profile. Conversely, mesh portals using the same cluster profile can be assigned different RF Radio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. Management Radio profiles to achieve frequency separation.

About High-Throughput Radio Profiles

Each 802.11a 802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. and 802.11g 802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. radio profile also references a high-throughput profile that manages an AP or AP group’s 40 MHz Megahertz tolerance settings.

About Mesh High-Throughput SSID Profiles

High-throughput APs support additional settings not available in legacy APs. A mesh high-throughput SSID Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. profile can enable or disable high-throughput (802.11n 802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.) features and 40 MHz Megahertz channel usage, and define values A-MDPUs and MCS Modulation and Coding Scheme. MCS is used as a parameter to determine the data rate of a wireless connection for high throughput. ranges.

Aruba provides a default version of the mesh high-throughput SSID Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. profile. You can use the default version or create a new instance of a profile which you can then edit as you need. High-throughput mesh nodes operating in different cluster profiles can share the same high-throughput SSID Service Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. radio profile.

About Wired AP Profiles

The wired AP profile controls the configuration of the Ethernet Ethernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. ports on your AP. You can use the wired AP profile to configure Ethernet Ethernet is a network protocol for data transmission over LAN. ports for bridging or secure jack operation using the wired AP profile.

About Mesh Recovery Profiles

In addition to the default and user-defined mesh cluster profiles, mesh nodes also have a recovery profile. The Mobility Master dynamically generates a recovery profile, and each mesh node provisioned by the same Mobility Master has the same recovery profile. The recovery profile is based on a PSK Pre-shared key. A unique shared secret that was previously shared between two parties by using a secure channel. This is used with WPA security, which requires the owner of a network to provide a passphrase to users for network access. , and mesh nodes use the recovery profile to establish a link to the managed device if the mesh link is broken and no other mesh cluster profiles are available.

The mesh portal advertises the provisioned cluster profile. If a mesh point is unaware of the active mesh cluster profile, but is aware of and has the same recovery profile as the mesh portal, the mesh point can use the recovery profile to connect to the mesh portal.

The mesh point must have the same recovery profile as the parent to which it connects. If you provision the mesh points with the same Mobility Master, the recovery profiles should match.

To verify that the recovery profile names match, use the following command:
show ap mesh debug provisioned-clusters {ap-name <name> | bssid <bssid> | ip-addr <ipaddr>}.

To view the recovery profile on the managed device, use the following command:
show running-config | include recovery
.

If a mesh point connects to a parent using the recovery profile, it may immediately exit recovery if the parent is actively using one of its provisioned mesh cluster profiles. Once in recovery, a mesh point periodically exits recovery to see if it can connect using an available provisioned mesh cluster profile. The recovery profile is read-only; it cannot be modified or deleted.

The recovery profile is stored in the Mobility Master’s configuration file and is unique to that Mobility Master. If necessary, you can transfer your configuration to another managed device. If you do so, make sure your new mesh cluster is running and you have re-provisioned the mesh nodes before deleting your previous configuration. The APs learn the new recovery profile after they are provisioned with the new managed device. This is also true if you provision a mesh node with one Mobility Master and use it with a different Mobility Master. In this case, the recovery profile does not work on the mesh node until you re-provision it with the new Mobility Master.