Configuring ARM Features on an Instant AP

This section describes the following procedures for configuring ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. features:

Band Steering

Airtime Fairness Mode

Client Match

Access Point Control

Band Steering

The bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering feature assigns the dual-band capable clients to the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. on dual-band Instant APs. This feature reduces co-channel interference and increases available bandwidth for dual-band clients, because there are more channels on the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. than that on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. You can configure bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering parameters through the WebUI or the CLICommand-Line Interface. A console interface with a command line shell that allows users to execute text input as commands and convert these commands to appropriate functions..

In the Old WebUI

To configure bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering:

1. Go to RFARM.

2. Select one of the following options from the Band steering mode drop-down list:

Table 1: Band Steering Mode—Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Prefer 5 Ghz

Select this option to use bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering in the 5 GHzGigahertz. mode. On selecting this, the Instant AP steers the client to the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. (if the client is 5 GHzGigahertz.-capable), but allows the client connection on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. if the client persistently attempts for 2.4 GHzGigahertz. association.

Force 5 Ghz

Select this option to enforce 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering mode on the Instant APs.

Balance Bands

Select this option to allow the Instant AP to balance the clients across the two radios to best utilize the available 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandwidth. This feature takes into account the fact that the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. has more channels than the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation., and that the 5 GHzGigahertz. channels operate in 40 MHzMegahertz, while the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. operates in 20 MHzMegahertz.

Disabled

Select this option if you want to allow the clients to select the bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. to use.

3. Click OK.

In the New WebUI

To configure bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering:

1. Navigate to the Configuration > RF page.

2. Expand ARM.

3. Select one of the following options from the Band steering mode drop-down list:

Table 2: Band Steering Mode—Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Prefer 5 Ghz

Select this option to use bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering in the 5 GHzGigahertz. mode. On selecting this, the Instant AP steers the client to the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. (if the client is 5 GHzGigahertz.-capable), but allows the client connection on the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. if the client persistently attempts for 2.4 GHzGigahertz. association.

Force 5 Ghz

Select this option to enforce 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering mode on the Instant APs.

Balance Bands

Select this option to allow the Instant AP to balance the clients across the two radios to best utilize the available 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandwidth. This feature takes into account the fact that the 5 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. has more channels than the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation., and that the 5 GHzGigahertz. channels operate in 40 MHzMegahertz, while the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. operates in 20 MHzMegahertz.

Disabled

Select this option if you want to allow the clients to select the bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. to use.

4. Click Save.

In the CLI

To configure bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering:

(Instant AP)(config)# arm

(Instant AP)(ARM)# band-steering-mode {<Prefer 5 GHz>| <Force 5 GHz>|<Balance Bands>|<Disabled>}

Airtime Fairness Mode

The airtime fairness feature provides equal access to all clients on the wireless medium, regardless of client type, capability, or operating system, thus delivering uniform performance to all clients. This feature prevents the clients from monopolizing resources. You can configure airtime fairness mode parameters through the WebUI or the CLICommand-Line Interface. A console interface with a command line shell that allows users to execute text input as commands and convert these commands to appropriate functions..

In the Old WebUI

To configure Airtime fairness mode:

1. Go to RFARM > Show advanced options.

2. Select one of the following options from the Airtime fairness mode drop-down list.

Table 3: Airtime Fairness Mode—Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Default Access

Select this option to provide access based on client requests. When Air Time Fairness is set to default access, per-user and per-SSID bandwidth limits are not enforced.

Fair Access

Select this option to allocate Airtime evenly across all the clients.

Preferred Access

Select this option to set a preference where 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. clients are assigned more airtime than 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network.. The 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. clients get more airtime than 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps.. The ratio is 16:4:1.

3. Click OK.

In the New WebUI

To configure Airtime fairness mode:

1. Navigate to the Configuration > RF page.

2. Expand ARM.

3. Select one of the following options from the Airtime fairness mode drop-down list.

Table 4: Airtime Fairness Mode—Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Default Access

Select this option to provide access based on client requests. When Air Time Fairness is set to default access, per-user and per-SSID bandwidth limits are not enforced.

Fair Access

Select this option to allocate Airtime evenly across all the clients.

Preferred Access

Select this option to set a preference where 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz. clients are assigned more airtime than 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network.. The 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps. or 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. clients get more airtime than 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps.. The ratio is 16:4:1.

4. Click Save.

In the CLI

(Instant AP)(config)# arm

(Instant AP)(ARM)# air-time-fairness-mode {<Default Access>| <Fair Access> | <Preferred Access>

Client Match

The ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. client match feature continually monitors a client's RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood to provide ongoing client bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering and load balancing, and enhanced Instant AP reassignment for roaming mobile clients. This feature supersedes the legacy bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering and spectrum load balancing features, which unlike client match, do not trigger Instant AP changes for clients already associated to an Instant AP. In addition to this, the Client Match feature provides the smartphone handoff assist function which helps smartphones to switch between 3GThird Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See W-CDMA. and 4GFourth Generation of Wireless Mobile Telecommunications Technology. See LTE. networks when the Wi-FiWi-Fi is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a WLAN network, mainly using the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz radio bands. Wi-Fi can apply to products that use any 802.11 standard. connectivity is poor. The Instant AP monitors the RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. of the smartphone and checks if it remains under the threshold connectivity strength for a certain duration and deauthenticates the client.

 

Legacy 802.11a802.11a provides specifications for wireless systems. Networks using 802.11a operate at radio frequencies in the 5 GHz band. The specification uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that is especially well suited to use in office settings. The maximum data transfer rate is 54 Mbps., 802.11b802.11b is a WLAN standard often called Wi-Fi and is backward compatible with 802.11. Instead of the Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation method used in 802.11 standards, 802.11b uses Complementary Code Keying (CCK) that allows higher data speeds and makes it less susceptible to multipath-propagation interference. 802.11b operates in the 2.4 GHz band and the maximum data transfer rate is 11 Mbps., or 802.11g802.11g offers transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps, compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum of 802.11b standard. 802.11g employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), the modulation scheme used in 802.11a, to obtain higher data speed. Computers or terminals set up for 802.11g can fall back to speed of 11 Mbps, so that 802.11b and 802.11g devices can be compatible within a single network. access points do not support the client match feature. When client match is enabled on 802.11n802.11n is a wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards, 802.11a and 802.11g. With 802.11n, there will be a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbps to 600 Mbps with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.-capable access points, the client match feature overrides any settings configured for the legacy bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering, station handoff assist, or load balancing feature. 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band.-capable access points do not support the legacy bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. steering, station handoff assist, or load balancing settings; so these access points must be managed using client match.

When the client match feature is enabled on an Instant AP, the Instant AP measures the RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. health of its associated clients. In the current release, the client match feature is supported only within an Instant AP cluster. If any of the following trigger conditions is met, clients are moved from one Instant AP to another for better performance and client experience:

Dynamic Load Balancing—Client match balances clients across Instant APs on different channels, based on the client load on the Instant APs and the SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. levels the client detects from an underutilized Instant AP. If an Instant AP radio can support additional clients, the Instant AP will participate in client match load balancing and clients can be directed to that Instant AP radio, subject to the predefined SNRSignal-to-Noise Ratio. SNR is used for comparing the level of a desired signal with the level of background noise. thresholds. For better load balancing, clients are steered from busy channels to idle channels.

Sticky Clients—The client match feature also helps mobile clients that tend to stay associated to an Instant AP despite low signal levels. Instant APs using client match continually monitor the client's RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. as the client roams between Instant APs, and move the client to an Instant AP when a better radio match can be found. This prevents mobile clients from remaining associated to the Instant APs with less than ideal RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values., which can cause poor connectivity and reduce performance for other clients associated with that Instant AP.

BandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. Steering—Instant APs using the client match feature monitor the RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. for clients that advertise a dual-band capability. If a client is currently associated to a 2.4 GHzGigahertz. radio and the Instant AP detects that the client has a good RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. from the 5 GHzGigahertz. radio, the Instant AP steers the client to the 5 GHzGigahertz. radio, as long as the 5 GHzGigahertz. RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values. is not significantly worse than the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. RSSIReceived Signal Strength Indicator. RSSI is a mechanism by which RF energy is measured by the circuitry on a wireless NIC (0-255). The RSSI is not standard across vendors. Each vendor determines its own RSSI scale/values., and the Instant AP retains a suitable distribution of clients on each of its radios.

Channel Utilization—Based on the percentage of channel utilization, clients are steered from a busy channel to an idle channel.

Client Capability Match—Based on the client capability match, clients are steered to appropriate channel, for example, HT20, HT40, or VHT80.

 

Starting from the Instant 6.3.1.1-4.0 release, spectrum load balancing is integrated with the client match feature. Client match allows the Instant APs in a cluster to be divided into several logical Instant AP RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood called domains, which share the same clients. The network determines the distribution of clients and balances client load across channels, regardless of whether the Instant AP is responding to the probe requests of wireless clients.

Client Match Support for Standalone Instant APs

Previously, client match keys were generated by the virtual controller key to differentiate whether or not Instant APs belonged to the same cluster. If the client match keys did not match, client match functionality failed to take effect on standalone Instant APs within the same management VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN..

Instant 8.4.0.0 supports the client match functionality across standalone Instant APs within the same management VLANVirtual Local Area Network. In computer networking, a single Layer 2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them through one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a Virtual Local Area Network, Virtual LAN, or VLAN.. Client match uses the wired layer 2 protocol to synchronize information exchanged between Instant APs. Users have an option to configure the client match keys. Instant APs verify if the frames that they broadcast contain a common client match key. Instant APs that receive these frames verify if the sender belongs to same network or if the sender and receiver both have the same client match key. The receiver adds the sender’s information to the client match scope. After the sender's information is added, the client match functionality takes effect for standalone Instant APs as well.

You can configure client match parameters in the WebUI or the CLICommand-Line Interface. A console interface with a command line shell that allows users to execute text input as commands and convert these commands to appropriate functions.. When client match is enabled, the dashboard in the main window displays the Client Match link on selecting an Instant AP in the Access Points tab or a client in the Clients tab. Clicking this link provides a graphical representation of radio map view of an Instant AP and the client distribution on an Instant AP radio. For more information, see Client Match .

In the Old WebUI

1. For client match configuration, specify the following parameters in the RF ARM > Show advanced options tab:

Table 5: Client Match Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Client match

Select Enabled to enable the Client match feature on Instant APs. When enabled, client count will be balanced among all the channels in the same bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. For more information, see ARM Overview. By default, the client match feature is disabled.

NOTE: When client match is enabled, ensure that Scanning is enabled.

CM calculating interval

Specify a value for calculating the interval of Client match. The value specified for CM calculating interval determines the interval at which client match is calculated. The interval is specified in seconds and the default value is 30 seconds. You can specify a value within the range of 10–600.

CM neighbor matching %

Specify a value for CM neighbor matching %. This number takes into account the least similarity percentage to be considered as in the same virtual RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood of client match. You can specify a percentage value within the range of 20–100. The default value is 60%.

CM threshold

Specify a value for CM threshold. This number takes acceptance client count difference among all the channels of client match into account. When the client load on an Instant AP reaches or exceeds the threshold, client match is enabled on that Instant AP.

You can specify a value within range of 1–255. The default value is 2.

SLB mode

Select a mode from the SLB mode drop-down list. The SLB mode determines the balancing strategy for client match. The following options are available:

Channel

Radio

Channel + Radio

2. Click OK.

In the New WebUI

1. For client match configuration, specify the following parameters in Configuration > RF ARM > Show advanced options:

Table 6: Client Match Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Client match

Click the toggle switch to enable the Client match feature on Instant APs. When enabled, client count will be balanced among all the channels in the same bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. For more information, see ARM Overview. By default, the client match feature is disabled.

NOTE: When client match is enabled, ensure that Scanning is enabled.

CM calculating interval

Specify a value for calculating the interval of Client match. The value specified for CM calculating interval determines the interval at which client match is calculated. The interval is specified in seconds and the default value is 30 seconds. You can specify a value within the range of 10–600.

CM neighbor matching %

Specify a value for CM neighbor matching %. This number takes into account the least similarity percentage to be considered as in the same virtual RFRadio Frequency. RF refers to the electromagnetic wave frequencies within a range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz, including the frequencies used for communications or Radar signals. neighborhood of client match. You can specify a percentage value within the range of 20–100. The default value is 60%.

CM threshold

Specify a value for CM threshold. This number takes acceptance client count difference among all the channels of client match into account. When the client load on anInstant AP reaches or exceeds the threshold, client match is enabled on that Instant AP.

You can specify a value within range of 1–255. The default value is 2.

CM key

Specify a client match key in CM key. When Instant APs in a different cluster configure the same client match key, the client match functionality works for these Instant APs.

NOTE: This parameter is not available in the old WebUI.

SLB mode

Select a mode from the SLB mode drop-down list. The SLB mode determines the balancing strategy for client match. The following options are available:

Channel

Radio

Channel + Radio

2. Click Save.

In the CLI

(Instant AP)(config)# arm

(Instant AP)(ARM)# client-match calc-interval <seconds>

(Instant AP)(ARM)# client-match calc-threshold <threshold>

(Instant AP)(ARM)# client-match nb-matching <percentage>

(Instant AP)(ARM)# client-match slb-mode 1

Access Point Control

You can configure access point control parameters through the WebUI or the CLICommand-Line Interface. A console interface with a command line shell that allows users to execute text input as commands and convert these commands to appropriate functions..

In the Old WebUI

1. For Access Point Control, specify the following parameters in the RFARM > Show advanced options tab:

Table 7: Access Point Control—Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Customize valid channels

Select this check box to customize valid channels for 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz.. By default, the Instant AP uses valid channels as defined by the Country Code (regulatory domain). On selecting the Customize valid channels check box, a list of valid channels for both 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz. are displayed. The valid channel customization feature is disabled by default.

Min transmit power

Specify the minimum transmission power. The value specified for Min transmit power indicates the minimum EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. that can range from 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. to 33 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. in 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. increments. If the minimum transmission EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. setting configured on an Instant AP is not supported by the Instant AP model, this value is reduced to the highest supported power setting. The default value for minimum transmit power is 18 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

Max transmit power

Specify the maximum transmission power. The value specified for Max transmit power indicates the maximum EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. that can range from 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. to 33 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. in 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. increments. If the maximum transmission EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. configured on an Instant AP is not supported by the Instant AP model, the value is reduced to the highest supported power setting. The default value for maximum transmit power is 127 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

Client aware

When enabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. does not change channels for the Instant APs with active clients, except for high-priority events such as RADAR or excessive noise. This feature must be enabled in most deployments for a stable WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection.. If the Client Aware mode is set to Disabled, the Instant AP may change to a more optimal channel, that may disrupt the current client traffic for a while. The Client aware option is Enabled by default.

NOTE: When Client aware is disabled, channels can be changed even when the clients are active on a BSSIDBasic Service Set Identifier. The BSSID identifies a particular BSS within an area. In infrastructure BSS networks, the BSSID is the MAC address of the AP. In independent BSS or ad hoc networks, the BSSID is generated randomly..

Scanning

Select Enabled so that the Instant AP dynamically scans all 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. channels within its 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. regulatory domain at regular intervals and reports to the Instant AP. This scanning report includes WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. coverage, interference, and intrusion detection data.

NOTE: For client match configuration, ensure that scanning is enabled.

Wide channel bands

Select a bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. to allow the Instant APs to be placed in 40 MHzMegahertz (wide bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.) channels. The Wide channel bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. allows administrators to configure 40 MHzMegahertz channels in the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz. bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. 40 MHzMegahertz channels are two 20 MHzMegahertz adjacent channels that are bonded together. A 40 MHzMegahertz channel effectively doubles the frequency bandwidth available for data transmission.

80MHz support

Enables or disables the use of 80 MHzMegahertz channels on Instant APs. This feature allows ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. to assign 80 MHzMegahertz channels on Instant APs with 5 GHzGigahertz. radios, which support a VHTVery High Throughput. IEEE 802.11ac is an emerging VHT WLAN standard that could achieve physical data rates of close to 7 Gbps for the 5 GHz band.. This setting is enabled by default.

NOTE: Only the Instant APs that support 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band. can be configured with 80 MHzMegahertz channels.

2. Reboot the Instant AP.

3. Click OK.

In the New WebUI

1. For Access Point Control, configure the following parameters in Configuration > RFARM > Show advanced options:

Table 8: Access Point Control—Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Description

Customize valid channels

Click the toggle switch based on how you want to customize valid channels for 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz.. By default, the Instant AP uses valid channels as defined by the Country Code (regulatory domain). On enabling Customize valid channels, a list of valid channels for both 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz. are displayed. The valid channel customization feature is disabled by default.

Min transmit power

Specify the minimum transmission power. The value specified for Min transmit power indicates the minimum EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. that can range from 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. to 33 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. in 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. increments. If the minimum transmission EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. setting configured on anInstant AP is not supported by the Instant AP model, this value is reduced to the highest supported power setting. The default value for minimum transmit power is 18 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

Max transmit power

Select the maximum transmission power value from the Max transmit power drop-down list indicates the maximum EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. that can range from 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. to 33 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. in 3 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors. increments. If the maximum transmission EIRPEffective Isotropic Radiated Power or Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power. EIRP refers to the output power generated when a signal is concentrated into a smaller area by the Antenna. configured on anInstant AP is not supported by the Instant AP model, the value is reduced to the highest supported power setting. The default value for maximum transmit power is 127 dBmDecibel-Milliwatts. dBm is a logarithmic measurement (integer) that is typically used in place of mW to represent receive-power level. AMP normalizes all signals to dBm, so that it is easy to evaluate performance between various vendors..

Client aware

When enabled, ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. does not change channels for the Instant APs with active clients, except for high-priority events such as RADAR or excessive noise. This feature must be enabled in most deployments for a stable WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection.. If the client aware mode is disabled, the Instant AP may change to a more optimal channel, that may disrupt the current client traffic for a while. The client aware parameter is enabled by default.

NOTE: When Client Aware is disabled, channels can be changed even when the clients are active on a BSSIDBasic Service Set Identifier. The BSSID identifies a particular BSS within an area. In infrastructure BSS networks, the BSSID is the MAC address of the AP. In independent BSS or ad hoc networks, the BSSID is generated randomly..

Scanning

Click the toggle switch so that the Instant AP dynamically scans all 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. channels within its 802.11802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless LANs developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) for path sharing. regulatory domain at regular intervals and reports to the Instant AP. This scanning report includes WLANWireless Local Area Network. WLAN is a 802.11 standards-based LAN that the users access through a wireless connection. coverage, interference, and intrusion detection data.

NOTE: For client match configuration, ensure that scanning is enabled.

Wide channel bands

Select a bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. to allow the Instant APs to be placed in 40 MHzMegahertz (wide bandBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.) channels. The Wide channel bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. allows administrators to configure 40 MHzMegahertz channels in the 2.4 GHzGigahertz. and 5 GHzGigahertz. bandsBand refers to a specified range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.. 40 MHzMegahertz channels are two 20 MHzMegahertz adjacent channels that are bonded together. A 40 MHzMegahertz channel effectively doubles the frequency bandwidth available for data transmission.

80MHz support

Enables or disables the use of 80 MHzMegahertz channels on Instant APs. This feature allows ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. to assign 80 MHzMegahertz channels on Instant APs with 5 GHzGigahertz. radios, which support a VHTVery High Throughput. IEEE 802.11ac is an emerging VHT WLAN standard that could achieve physical data rates of close to 7 Gbps for the 5 GHz band.. This setting is enabled by default.

NOTE: Only the Instant APs that support 802.11ac802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 family that provides high-throughput WLANs on the 5 GHz band. can be configured with 80 MHzMegahertz channels.

2. Click Save.

3. Reboot the Instant AP.

In the CLI

To configure access point control parameters:

(Instant AP)(config)# arm

(Instant AP)(ARM)# a-channels <5GHz-channels>

(Instant AP)(ARM)# min-tx-power <power>

(Instant AP)(ARM)# max-tx-power <power>

(Instant AP)(ARM)# client-aware

(Instant AP)(ARM)# wide-bands {<5GHz>|<2GHz>|<All>|<None>}

(Instant AP)(ARM)# scanning

(Instant AP)(ARM)# 80mhz-support

Verifying ARM Configuration

To view ARMAdaptive Radio Management. ARM dynamically monitors and adjusts the network to ensure that all users are allowed ready access. It enables full utilization of the available spectrum to support maximum number of users by intelligently choosing the best RF channel and transmit power for APs in their current RF environment. configuration:

(Instant AP)# show arm config

 

Minimum Transmit Power :18

Maximum Transmit Power :127

Band Steering Mode :prefer-5ghz

Client Aware :enable

Scanning :enable

Wide Channel Bands :5ghz

80Mhz Support :enable

Air Time Fairness Mode :fair-access

Client Match :disable

CM NB Matching Percent :75

CM Calculating Interval :30

CM SLB Threshold :2

CM SLB Balancing Mode :channel based

CM max client match req :5

CM max adoption :5

Custom Channels :No

2.4 GHz Channels

----------------

Channel Status

------- ------

1 enable

2 disable

3 disable

4 disable

5 disable

6 enable

7 disable

8 disable

9 disable

10 disable

11 enable

12 disable

13 disable

1+ enable

2+ disable

3+ disable

4+ disable

5+ disable

6+ disable

7+ enable

5.0 GHz Channels

----------------

Channel Status

------- ------

36 enable

40 enable

44 enable

48 enable

52 enable

56 enable

60 enable

64 enable

149 enable

153 enable

157 enable

161 enable

165 enable

36+ enable

44+ enable

52+ disable

60+ disable

149+ enable

157+ enable

36E enable

52E enable

149E enable

Client Match for Access Points in a Zone

When Client match is enabled, the decision to move a client from the home Instant AP to a target Instant AP is made at the radio level. However, this proves inefficient when client match is enabled on an Instant AP or SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. operating in a specific zone, it could result in the client being moved to a target Instant AP that does not have the same zone specific SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. as the home Instant AP.

Starting from Instant 6.5.1.0-4.3.1.0, the decision to move a client from a home Instant AP to a target Instant AP will be made at the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. level instead of the radio level, by adding the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. name to the client match radio database. Client Match will check if the same SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. (zone specific SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. on Home Instant AP) is available on the target Instant AP before it moves the client. This ensures that client match works as expected when zone settings are configured on the Instant AP.

Additionally, the maximum clients threshold and the current associated client number of the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. is added to the client match radio database to prevent the clients from being moved to an SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. whose associated client number is already reached its limit.

You can use the following commands to view the SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. details stored in client match:

The show ap client-match-ssid-table command displays the client match SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. table for the current Instant AP and its neighboring Instant APs.

The show ap client-match-ssid-table radio-mac <mac> command displays the client match SSIDService Set Identifier. SSID is a name given to a WLAN and is used by the client to access a WLAN network. table for a specific Instant AP denoted by its mac address.